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President Donald Trump is demanding a congressional inquiry into a widely disputed allegation that former president Barack Obama ordered the tapping of Mr. Trump’s phones before the 2016 presidential election. (Doug Mills/NYT)
President Donald Trump is demanding a congressional inquiry into a widely disputed allegation that former president Barack Obama ordered the tapping of Mr. Trump’s phones before the 2016 presidential election. (Doug Mills/NYT)

WHAT READERS THINK

March 10: He Trumps himself. Plus other letters to the editor Add to ...

Letters to the Editor should be exclusive to The Globe and Mail. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. Try to keep letters to fewer than 150 words. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. To submit a letter by e-mail, click here: letters@globeandmail.com

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He Trumps himself

Re President Paranoid (March 9): Anyone who wants to claim that Donald Trump has reached “a new low” needs to be quick about it. Mr. Trump’s ability to trump himself and lower the bar still further on presidential behaviour is without precedent. And that’s not paranoia speaking.

Sharon Brown, Winnipeg

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Donald Trump’s tweet about former president Barack Obama is the latest in a disturbing trend of conspiracy-style accusations without evidence. False claims that Mr. Obama was not born in the United States accelerated during the campaign with, for example, ludicrous accusations about thousands of Muslim-Americans cheering from rooftops on 9/11, and Ted Cruz’s father’s connection to Lee Harvey Oswald before JFK’s assassination.

Even after being elected President and assuming the mantle of leader of the free world, Mr. Trump has continued with tabloid-style claims devoid of fact, and easily proven false – starting with the crowd size at his inauguration, and charges that up to five million fraudulent voters cast ballots against him. These claims have now accelerated to the point where Mr. Trump is accusing the former president of a crime without a shred of proof to back it up.

This pattern of constantly making up stories, which would be cause for parents to discipline their five-year-old, is distressing coming from a 70-year-old man who holds the most powerful office in the world. If the President of the United States, who has access to the nuclear codes upon which all of our lives depend, has such a tenuous grasp of reality, what will happen when he faces a real international crisis?

Jeff Buckstein, Kanata, Ont.

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Donald Trump, who is once again seeking an immigration ban, needs to be reminded of the vastly disproportionate gap that exists between deaths caused by terrorism in the United States, whether internally or externally generated, and those caused by the irresponsible, indiscriminate and often discriminatory use of too easily available firearms in that country. Untreated mental illness, racism, frustration, and the hate and rage prevalent within U.S. society today do more to fuel the slaughter of Americans than even the most extremist versions of Islam.

Ellen Pye, Delta, B.C.

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Ontario inmates, too

Like two other provinces before it, British Columbia is transferring responsibility for inmate health care from corrections to its Health Ministry, knowing this will improve information sharing and integration with care providers in the community, and enhance continuity of care for inmates when they are released from custody (B.C. Shifts Responsibility For Inmate Care – March 4).

As an RN who worked as an Ontario correctional nurse for many years, I have seen the health challenges inmates face, and I know the same step is needed in this province. It is my hope that Premier Kathleen Wynne will encourage collaboration between the province’s health and corrections ministers to explore a governance model for health care in Ontario jails.

Nova Scotia, Alberta and now British Columbia have paved the way. Let’s follow.

Rosemary Galbraith, member, Ontario Correctional Nurses’ Interest Group; Milton, Ont.

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ABC’s of Ukraine

Re Can Ukraine Reinvent Itself? (Report on Business, March 4): If Ukraine were to adopt the Roman alphabet, it would take an important step toward reinventing itself. The Cyrillic alphabet has helped keep Ukraine under Russian influence and hindered economic integration with European countries. Poland, for example, uses the Latin alphabet successfully. Ukraine could, too.

Tourism would be the first industry to benefit from the change. Ukraine is a beautiful country with a rich history, no less interesting to visitors than Western Europe.

Helen Schiele, Kelowna, B.C.

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Troops at risk

Re Dallaire Says Mefloquine Impaired Him (March 8): In early 1992, I went to Africa with my then-husband, a doctor, on a medical mission to Malawi. He was adamant that we not take mefloquine because of the well-known psychotic side effects, and that was 25 years ago!

We took malarone, an anti-malarial drug with no known psychotic effects; I have taken it many times since on subsequent trips to malaria zones.

Yet the Canadian and, to a lesser extent, American military have continued to order troops to take melfloquine, a generally cheaper but dangerous drug.

Why, when the side effects have been known for so many years?

Retired brigadier-general Joe Sharpe, who opposes a ban on mefloquine in the military, is quoted as saying: “If mefloquine is the only prophylactic you can find to protect the troops from malaria ... ”

Message to National Defence: Join the countries which have done the homework on this dangerous drug and stop putting our troops at risk.

Sally Moore, Toronto

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Canada’s dilemma

In an article in the Report on Business outlining the growing economic differences between Canada and the United States since November, Barrie McKenna notes that while the U.S. is lowering taxes and reducing environmental regulations, the Canadian government is not following its lead (Canada, The U.S. And An Economic Divide, March 4).

This, apparently, is making the Canadian business community “increasingly wary.”

In the front section on the same day, Shawn McCarthy reports that “nearly two-thirds of Canadians want the Liberal government to proceed with climate regulations, including carbon pricing” (Canadians Back War On GHGs, Poll Finds).

These articles neatly frame the dilemma facing Canadian policy makers. Like many Canadians, I voted for Justin Trudeau’s Liberals with the hope that he had the wisdom and the courage to choose policies that will preserve the planet for our grandchildren.

Edward Curry, Barrie, Ont.

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Is it not slightly ironic for Barrie McKenna, who stated in a February column that “nothing is more important to Canada’s well-being than its economic relationship with the United States” to now argue that governments in Canada have basically no option – given that close relationship – but to step back from efforts to reduce income inequality, improve working conditions and better protect the environment?

Michael Polanyi, Toronto

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Down on dirty

Re Stephen Marche On Why Squalor Is The Solution To Domestic Gender Politics (Life & Arts, March 3): For some guys, dirt is a threat to their moral purity. It’s not, so they need to get over it.

For most guys, dirt is like trouble. You have to deal with it when you see it, but you don’t have to go looking for it.

Boris DeWiel, Prince George, B.C.

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