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Wealthy donors are paying as much as $1,500 per ticket for private time with senior cabinet ministers, including Finance Minister Bill Morneau. (Cole Burston/Bloomberg)
Wealthy donors are paying as much as $1,500 per ticket for private time with senior cabinet ministers, including Finance Minister Bill Morneau. (Cole Burston/Bloomberg)

WHAT READERS THINK

Oct. 31: Where’s my invitation, Mr. Morneau? Plus other letters to the editor Add to ...

Letters to the Editor should be exclusive to The Globe and Mail. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. Try to keep letters to fewer than 150 words. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. To submit a letter by e-mail, click here: letters@globeandmail.com

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Uninvited …

I am upset! Finance Minister Bill Morneau and his boss Justin Trudeau said that access to a quiet chat with Bill was open to all Canadians. Well, I haven’t received my invitation from the Liberal Party! I want to know when and where the next access-for-cash evening is taking place. I can afford the $1,500 tab … if I don’t replace my front door this year.

I’m waiting, Bill. I promise you I’ll have my talking points ready!

Deborah McLean, Napanee, Ont.

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I see a difference between a $1,500 invitation to a fundraiser and a $100 donation. In a transparent system, both donors would be invited to the same event, each paying the amount they deem affordable and necessary.

Reinstating a per-vote subsidy would help insulate that transparency. As Canadians, we can choose a Canadian model for political fundraising – or an American one, where billionaires and other monied interests hold sway and unduly influence results.

Carl Hager, Pontiac, Que.

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Unbelievable …

Re Ontario Knew About Inmate’s Solitary Plight (Oct. 28): My tax dollars have been used to carry out the torture of Adam Capay and many others. Shameful!

I can not imagine spending even four weeks in solitary confinement, but four years without having been convicted of a crime? Unbelievable! Is Thunder Bay Jail to become Canada’s version of the Guantanamo Bay detention camp with its indefinite detention without trial?

The problems of abuse of solitary confinement have been before the eyes of the government for a long time. Where, O where, is the compassionate solution?

Maybe Yasir Naqvi, the Attorney-General with the faulty memory, should spend a few months in solitary himself to sharpen his recall. At the very least, he should resign for the abject cruelty carried out on his watch.

I want our government to stop spending my tax dollars on torture, now!

Paul MacPherson, Cobourg, Ont.

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Did Adam Capay just blend in with all the others in solitary confinement, nothing remarkable?

Is that why Yasir Naqvi, now the Attorney-General, can’t remember seeing him?

Someone should lose their job for sheer incompetency, not to mention inhumanity. This incident should help make up the minds of “undecided” Ontario voters at election time.

Helen Godfrey, Toronto

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Unconvinced …

Re Trudeau Names Nine Independent Senators Amid Transformation Attempt (Oct. 28): The new senators might not be Liberal, but they are decidedly liberal.

Will they support the government’s agenda? No doubt.

Are they genuinely independent? Not so much.

William Christian, retired professor, political science, Guelph, Ont.

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So the Prime Minister has appointed nine new senators. These folks are all fine, upstanding citizens – at least I hope they are – but can someone please explain why these individuals suddenly are now in a position to amend, approve, or disapprove legislation that has been debated and duly passed by our elected members of Parliament?

To whom are these new senators responsible?

If they have expertise to offer, why can’t they provide it by appearing before the parliamentary committees that review draft legislation? That seems like a much less expensive and more efficient way to conduct the nation’s business than does giving nine more people first-class seats on the gravy train.

Ken Cuthbertson, Kingston

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Unclear …

Re Clinton Campaign Looked To Copy Trudeau Idea, E-Mails Show (Politics Briefing, Oct. 25:) I would like to underline a few points that may not have been clear in the Clinton advisers’ reference to CBC’s Face to Face with the Prime Minister.

Face to Face with the Prime Minister was an original concept developed by CBC News. At no time did the Prime Minister’s Office influence the selection of guests, the framing of questions or the presentation of this special broadcast. Nor did we ever share information about the guests with the PMO.

CBC News devised the criteria for picking the Canadians who would interview the Prime Minister. We selected them based on the issues being covered in the election. There was no feeding facts, or lines, or arguments to them – these were their conversations.

We’re flattered that there seems to be interest in the concept from south of the border and from other public broadcasters around the world. It was successful because it was an innovative approach organized by journalists and not a communication exercise devised by political handlers.

Jennifer McGuire, general manager and editor in chief, CBC News and Centres

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Unrepentant …

Re Minister Protests Colleague’s Possible Firing (Oct. 28): A cashier at Loblaws decides that all fruit and vegetables should be free to everyone, and refuses to ring them up when a customer checks out. A dentist thinks it’s a waste of time to fill cavities and pulls out teeth that other dentists would fill.

What will happen to the cashier and the dentist?

A United Church minister decides that she no longer believes the vows she took on ordination, and the theological concepts she agreed to. She is now an atheist.

But she still wants to keep her United Church ministerial benefits – salary, pension, study leave etc. Sure, she’s intelligent, personable and well-liked by the members of her congregation.

And why should she not lead a church? But obviously not a Christian one.

If two dozen or more current and former ministers of the United Church are urging an end to the proceedings against her because it would “offend” the church’s “tradition of heterodoxy and inclusion,” then the United Church of Canada is in really big trouble.

Liz Muir, Toronto

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Unimpressed …

Re Officials Request More Staff To Address Border Wait Times (Oct. 27): The report that wait times at Canada’s second-busiest border crossing are “sky rocketing” is troubling, particularly now that we are heading into the peak cross border shopping period in the United States and Canada.

The cause apparently is that there has been a change in the job requirements for Canada Border Services Agency staff. They are now required to be certified to carry firearms, and there are not enough properly certified staff to fill the jobs.

I fear that until our public servants – you know, the ones we elect and pay to provide services to us, the public – start using those services just like we do, nothing will happen.

I invite Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale to start using these border crossings in the Niagara Region on a regular basis and see for himself what he is forcing others to endure.

Bob Allin, Toronto

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