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RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson apologized on behalf of the Mounties to hundreds of current and former female officers who were harassed and bullied on the force. (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press)
RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson apologized on behalf of the Mounties to hundreds of current and former female officers who were harassed and bullied on the force. (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press)

WHAT READERS THINK

Oct. 7: RCMP’s disgrace, our wallets. Plus other letters to the editor Add to ...

Letters to the Editor should be exclusive to The Globe and Mail. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. Try to keep letters to fewer than 150 words. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. To submit a letter by e-mail, click here: letters@globeandmail.com

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Mounties’ disgrace

The offer by the RCMP to settle sexual harassment complaints out of court just sweeps the issue under the carpet (RCMP Settling Hundreds Of Sexual Harassment Complaints In Costly Deal – Oct. 6).

If the matter had gone to court, those who were harassed would have had to identify their harassers and the managers who ignored this behaviour, so the proper punishment and compensation could be established.

This way, the harassers and the supervisors who turned a blind eye to the goings-on will likely get off scot-free or, at worst, receive a reprimand on their record. The compensation will not be paid by the guilty parties, instead, tax dollars will be used for the settlement because there is always more where they came from.

This is a sad day for the RCMP and for all Canadians who are forced to pick up the tab.

Steen Petersen, Nanaimo, B.C.

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‘Something stupid’

Re We Are, Officially, The Worst (Sports, Oct. 6): Cathal Kelly is on the mark with his assessment of beer-fuelled foolishness at Blue Jays games. His call to suspend alcohol sales for the remainder of Rogers Centre playoff contests would greatly lessen home crowd boorish behaviours. It would also cost the team a bundle. But the trade-off would be worth it.

Drinking alcohol at ball games is a privilege, not a right. Abusing that privilege should have consequences.

Geoff Smith, Kingston

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Cathal Kelly presents a strong case in favour of banning alcohol sales for the remaining games at the Rogers Centre.

Although I doubt an all-out ban would be imposed, at the very least fans should be offered non-alcoholic beverages in their seats. At a game last week, only beer and coolers were being hawked by vendors in the stands, to the disappointment of my thirsty seven-year-old son. Drinking anything else (like water) required leaving our seats and missing part of the game.

Jeff Feiner, Toronto

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We have seen over the years that pretty much regardless of what city a sports venue is in, when alcohol in the mix, this is what you risk getting.

Unfortunately, this time it puts Toronto in an unfavourable light, as it just happened to occur at a Jays game on a night where the game was broadcast in Canada and the United States.

If this had happened in New York, for instance, all that people would be saying is, “That’s New York for you.”

We have to look at this in the light that it belongs in: A fan got carried away and did something stupid. The Toronto police are handling this, and we shouldn’t give it too much more thought.

Gregory Boudreau, Halifax

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Fewer than half

Re Nuclear-Safety Watchdog Lagging: Report (Oct. 5): The devastating report on Canada’s nuclear safety agency sheds light on a culture of passivity and negligence.

Only 48 per cent of the required inspections of nuclear plants in 2013-14 and 2014-15 were completed under the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission’s watch – but we’re assured that they represent the international gold standard.

Does this mean, for example, that only half of the nuclear reactors in the Greater Toronto Area have been inspected?

Imagine going for a bungee jump and the operator only does a safety check on half the participants. This seems absurd, but it appears to be standard practice for a regulator that is far too cozy with the industry it is tasked with monitoring.

Kirsten Dahl, Toronto

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Neutered watchdog

Re Espionage Bill Will Allow PM To Muzzle Watchdog, Report Says (Oct. 6): You report that Bill C-22, Canada’s new spy-accountability legislation, will contain a “watchdog” component.

Given that the bill allows prime ministers and cabinet to block and censor that watchdog, a more appropriate headline might have been: PM Orders Obedience Training And Neutering Of Watchdog. Sit! Stay! Good boy!

Steve Sanderson, Quispamsis, N.B.

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Carbon future?

Re The Challenges Ahead For Liberals’ Carbon Plan (Oct. 6): Does our PM think a carbon tax will lead to a revolution in green technology which will put an electric car in every laneway and render pipelines obsolete? Technological revolutions are not created by politicians, but by scientists and engineers doing research and development, something that is poorly supported in Canada.

In Ontario, the McGuinty and Wynne governments already tried to impose a green revolution and we know how that turned out.

If Canada meets its obligations under the Paris climate accord, it will be because what remains of our manufacturing industry will have gone elsewhere. Can someone explain to me how mankind will benefit by relocating the production of greenhouse gas to China?

Hubert Hogle, Napanee, Ont.

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Minister replies

No reference was made in your editorial, Teachers’ Pet (Oct. 5), to the individuals who would benefit most from keeping teachers and educational workers in their classrooms: our students.

Labour peace is worth preserving because it means our focus remains on student achievement and success.

The previous round of bargaining ended last fall, and we recognized that as we adjusted to a new framework this process required more time and resources from all parties involved, leaving the system fatigued.

Stability in the system is paramount at this time. The fruits of our last round of labour negotiations are still being implemented. Many new opportunities for dialogue between the Ministry of Education and our sector partners now exist, allowing for better collaboration and focus to be given to shared priorities.

Any path forward will respect the needs of the system and our fiscal plan, but at the end of the day, we have an opportunity to show Ontario’s youngest learners that the adults involved in their education are working together and focused on their path to success.

Mitzie Hunter, Ontario Minister of Education

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The Ontario Liberals paid the teachers unions to help offset their negotiating costs; the teachers unions spent millions on pro-Liberal ads during the last election. Why is this even legal?

An election is coming, and the Liberals announce that there is more money for teachers if they extend their contract and don’t disrupt things during an election year. Of course, one union deal will trigger other union deals. Why isn’t this considered to be collusion, or worse?

Doesn’t anyone care about this obvious and exceedingly malodorous manipulation? Or does Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne think she is a really smart business person, like Donald Trump?

Cam Kourany, Kelowna, B.C.

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