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The Canvas mid-rise’s sense of intimacy will be enhanced by having just 155 suites and some commercial space.
The Canvas mid-rise’s sense of intimacy will be enhanced by having just 155 suites and some commercial space.

Space to stretch out on the Danforth at condo development Canvas Add to ...

THE DEVELOPMENT Canvas

BUILDER/DEVELOPER Marlin Spring Developments

SIZE 427 to 961 square feet

PRICE Mid-$200,000s to over $500,000

CONTACT To register, phone 416-519-8843 or visit canvascondos.ca

Marlin Spring Developments has acquired an entire block on the east Danforth, an expansive palette on which it says it will craft a mid-rise condo with light-filled spaces.

The developer assembled four connected properties at 2301 to 2315 Danforth Ave. – two parking lots and two former commercial buildings near Main Street.

“This is probably the largest frontage by three times in terms of exposure on the Danforth,” chief operating officer Zev Mandelbaum says. “It stretches from Morton Road, all the way to the Petro-Canada on Patricia Drive.”

The extra width of the eight-storey development will allow clear sightlines and sunlight to reach more areas than just principal rooms and master suites, Mr. Mandelbaum says.

“Conventional mid-rise [units] are usually deeper and narrower because the frontage is more valuable,” Mr. Mandelbaum explains.

“Here, you get these wide/shallow units … and you have so much light exposure from these wide/shallow units that it’s a very friendly and upbeat environment.”

Even terraces will measure up to 500 square feet. “Because it’s a mid-rise, there’s terracing at the back that creates opportunities for a lot of light exposure and large terraces overlooking the downtown and waterfront,” Mr. Mandelbaum notes.

“It creates a kind of a laid-back lifestyle where you have a unit that is very livable, not a little hamster cage high in the sky.”

The sense of intimacy will be enhanced by having just 156 suites and some commercial space completed in the building by June, 2019.

“The fact there’s no 90-storey tower coming to blow you out of the water, makes it very appealing, and there are only so many condominiums that will come up on the Danforth,” Mr. Mandelbaum says.

“There will be retail at the corner of Morton and Danforth and all along the Danforth. We envision a coffee shop and eclectic retail to bring vibrancy to the streetscape.”

The brick and glass structure, designed by Graziani & Corazza Architects, will complement adjacent storefronts, restaurants and businesses. The site will also be a short jaunt to Greektown eateries, specialty grocers and shops, such as Big Carrot, as well as parks and trails winding down to the lake.

“There’s a lot of value in the east end,” says Mr. Mandelbaum, who has two more projects in the works nearby. “[Buyers] love the design, the amenities, location and access to transit with two subway stops around the corner and the GO bus [station].”

Exclusive to residents will be a fitness centre and rooftop terrace with a fireplace, bocce court, dining and barbecue areas.

“I would say we’ll have one of the most well-designed meeting rooms in the city, which is a party room with a catering kitchen and dining room,” Mr. Mandelbaum adds.

The sales centre to open later this fall will showcase one- to two-bedroom-plus-den plans U31 designed with wide-plank laminate floors, quartz counters and stainless-steel kitchen appliances, plus various green features.

Monthly fees will be 57 cents a square foot, and parking and lockers $35,000 and $4,000 respectively.

 

Editor's note: The original print and online versions of this story had the contact phone number, the number of suites and the size of terraces wrong. This online version has been corrected.

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