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Some distractions are good for leaders, such as chatting with colleagues. (Paul Vasarhelyi/Getty Images/iStockphoto)
Some distractions are good for leaders, such as chatting with colleagues. (Paul Vasarhelyi/Getty Images/iStockphoto)

power points

Good distractions are worth embracing Add to ...

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We’re warned to be wary of distractions, but John Bossong, general manager of a truck rental company, says there are also distractions for managers to embrace: Taking time to connect with people, communicating with staff, and living the values of your organization.Lead Change Group Blog

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In-house centre fosters innovation

Samsung’s Values Innovation Program Center reviews ideas for major innovations and then assembles a team to pursue the most promising. The centre is open 24 hours a day, has 20 project rooms, 38 bedrooms, a gym, and, of course, table tennis. Harvard Business Review Blogs

Spur new leaders with real challenges

Management consultant Art Petty says companies move too slowly in exposing developing leaders to challenging situations. You should point the way, but not provide a map; let them sweat the decisions; and provide frequent challenges in compressed periods of time. Management Excellence Blog

Even better than letters on the pillow

When marketing consultant Don Peppers travels for business he finds love letters from his wife packed in his bag, one for each night he is away, in envelopes with the appropriate dates. It’s the last thing he reads before going to sleep and first thing on awakening. Entrepreneur.com

Outlook rule can help focus your e-mail

Nathan Zeldes, who blogs about information overload, has an Outook e-mail tip to help you focus on messages meant for you. Use the “Rules and Alerts” option to set this rule: If received message has my address on the CC: line, and my first name is not in the message body, then move it to a secondary folder for later review. Nathan Zeldes Newsletter

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