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A man procrastinates by listening to music at work. (David Broberg/Getty Images/iStockphoto)
A man procrastinates by listening to music at work. (David Broberg/Getty Images/iStockphoto)

Power Points

Procrastination can be positive Add to ...

This is the latest news and information for workers and managers from across the Web universe, brought to you by Monday Morning Manager writer Harvey Schachter. Follow us on Twitter @Globe_Careers or on our Linked In group.

 

Consultant Mary Jo Asmus says procrastination can be a verb, an action we take rather than something we fall into. And it can be positive, allowing us to reduce stress by putting something off, or secure time for thought, leading to better actions in the end. Aspire Blog

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Special to The Globe and Mail

Harvey Schachter is a Battersea, Ont.-based writer specializing in management issues. He writes Monday Morning Manager and management book reviews for the print edition of Report on Business and an online work-life column Balance. E-mail Harvey Schachter

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