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(Sharon Dominick/iStockphoto)
(Sharon Dominick/iStockphoto)

Power Points

Spend time with your boss, its pays off Add to ...

This is the latest news and information for workers and managers from across the Web universe, brought to you by Monday Morning Manager writer Harvey Schachter. Follow us on Twitter @Globe_Careers or join our Linked In group.

Employees who spend about six hours a week with their boss are 29 per cent more inspired, 30 per cent more engaged, 16 per cent more innovative, and 15 per cent more intrinsically motivated than employees who spend only one hour a week, research by the Leadership IQ consultancy shows. Leadership IQ

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Delegation begins with staff strengths

Write down your top five weaknesses and consider which staff members are stronger than you in each area. Now delegate those duties to them, rather than just the unpleasant tasks you dislike. They won’t feel dumped on and you can concentrate on your strengths – so productivity will increase. Organized Executive Blog

Heading out of town? Designate a buddy

Blogger Laurie Ruettimann says when travelling for conferences that may involve alcohol, have a buddy who knows where you are, stay two drinks behind the drunkest person, and call home twice every day, to fend off loneliness and remind you of your values. LaurieRuettimann.com

Simple secrets of a handshake

Research shows a simple handshake before a negotiation increases co-operative behaviour in two typical situations: Negotations where the interests of the parties are not completely opposed or not completely compatible, and those that are antagonistic, with the parties’ interests in total opposition at the outset. Harvard Business School Working Knowledge

How to get action with your e-mails

Information management specialist Nathan Zeldes recommends using an “action message” format to keep e-mails brief and clear in your organization. Have the subject line indicate the action required; in the body of the e-mail, quickly list what, when, why, and the essential details. Nathan Zeldes Newsletter

Harvey Schachter is a Battersea, Ont.-based writer specializing in management issues. He writes Monday Morning Manager and management book reviews for the print edition of Report on Business and an online work-life column Balance. E-mail Harvey Schachter

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