Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

Speaking up at a conference can help you meet more people. (pojoslaw/Getty Images/iStockphoto)
Speaking up at a conference can help you meet more people. (pojoslaw/Getty Images/iStockphoto)

power points

The real way to network at a conference Add to ...

This is the latest news and information for workers and managers from across the Web universe, brought to you by Monday Morning Manager writer Harvey Schachter. Follow us on Twitter @Globe_Careers or join our Linked In group.

Want to meet a lot of people at a conference? A powerful way is to ask a (sensible) question during a speaker event. When Vancouver consultant Darcy Rezac did that at a Singapore conference, the friendliness and approachability of others afterward indicated he had unexpectedly introduced himself to 600 people. Shepa Learning Company

More Related to this Story

Ditch your smartphone for an hour

Average smartphone users looks at their phone 143 times per day, which works out to nine times every waking hour, or once every 6.7 minutes. Consultant Kevin Eikenberry suggests setting an hourly limit for checking the smartphone and putting it out of reach in the office. KevinEikenberry.com

A strong work ethic will take you far

People who survive and thrive during tough periods are thought to succeed because of their resiliency. But blogger Laurie Ruettimann, who says she lacks resiliency, believes the key is actually a work ethic – a belief in the moral benefit and importance of work, even on the worst days. TheCynicalGirl.com

The only constant is change

Marketing consultant Drew McLellan says in marketing the constant is change, with a new technology or a new consumer trend right around every corner. The reality for business people is that no matter how successful your business is it’s always in transition – every day. The Marketing Minute

Make your e-mails look great

Litmus allows you to find out how your e-mails look and behave on a wide number of mobile devices and operating systems. It has a one-week free trial before payment is required. Larry Chase’s Web Digest for Marketers

Special to The Globe and Mail

Harvey Schachter is a Battersea, Ont.-based writer specializing in management issues. He writes Monday Morning Manager and management book reviews for the print edition of Report on Business and an online work-life column Balance. E-mail Harvey Schachter

In the know

Most popular videos »

Highlights

More from The Globe and Mail

Most popular