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power points

Why smart people may not be so smart Add to ...

Back when he was a director at the Monitor strategy consulting firm, Roger Martin, now dean at University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, was always hiring super-smart people, until he read an article by Harvard’s Chris Argyris. It argued that smart people have the hardest time learning. In particular, when things go wrong, they look outside themselves for the cause of the error; rather than learn from the incident, they set themselves up to repeat it. Harvard Business Review Blogs

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Need to contact one person? Try the phone

That ancient device known as the phone is the best form of communication when dealing with one person, argues blogger Craig Changfoot, a manager at B.C.’s Simon Fraser University. Use e-mail primarily for distributing information to a lot of people – you wouldn’t call 20 people to relay the same message to them. OrganizedActions.com

Make sure upgrades suit your business

Tech writer Dave Johnson suggests businesses not upgrade to Windows 8. Much of the changes involve the new touch-centric interface, aimed for tablets rather than the desktops and laptops that business people commonly use. It also promises a schizophrenic existence, with existing apps not running well and apps aimed for the new operating system not adapting well to the desktop. CBS MoneyWatch

Making typefaces match in Word

When copy-and-pasting text from a Web page or other document into a Microsoft Word page, most people want the newly added text to look the same as what is already on the page (rather than the typeface of the source file). But that doesn’t happen by default when you use CTRL-V in Word. To change the default, start with the Advanced button, found through Options in recent versions of the software. In the drop-down menus to the right of “Paste between documents” and “Paste between programs,” click Keep Text Only. CNET

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