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U.S. policy makers are worried that the country's unemployment rate may be getting an artificial slant from the number of people who have given up in their search for jobs. (Richard Cote/iStockphoto/Richard Cote/iStockphoto)
U.S. policy makers are worried that the country's unemployment rate may be getting an artificial slant from the number of people who have given up in their search for jobs. (Richard Cote/iStockphoto/Richard Cote/iStockphoto)

Dropping out of search may skew U.S. jobs data Add to ...

As U.S. policy makers fret about their high jobless rate, attention is increasingly turning to another troubling aspect of the labour market: A growing number of people are dropping out.

The Labour Department is expected to report on Friday that the jobless rate held steady at 8.5 per cent in January, according to the median view of Wall Street analysts, down from 9.4 per cent in December, 2010.

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