Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

Report on Business

Economy Lab

Delving into the forces that shape our living standards
Best Business Blog, EPPY awards, 2011 and 2012

Entry archive:

Economy Lab has moved

Only Globe Unlimited members will now have access to a wide range of insightful commentary
and analysis on the economy and markets previously offered on this page.


Globe Unlimited subscribers will be able to read these columns,
written by some of Canada’s most deeply respected economists,
such as Christopher Ragan, Sheryl King, Andrew Jackson, and Clement Gignac,
as part of our ROB INSIGHT section.


All of our readers will still be able to browse the Economy Lab archives and read our
broader coverage of economic data and news by accessing their 10 free articles a month.


Learn more about Globe Unlimited and how to subscribe.

Miners leave the Rocanville Potash Corp. site. (David Stobbe for The Globe and Mail)
Miners leave the Rocanville Potash Corp. site. (David Stobbe for The Globe and Mail)

A newshound’s lament: The best and worst jobs in Canada Add to ...

Imagine the dismay around The Globe and Mail newsroom a few months ago when a widely publicized U.S. report declared “newspaper reporter” as the worst job in the United States. We all wondered why we seemed to be having so much fun doing it, if it was really so lousy. Perhaps it was just because we all look so cool in those fedoras.

More Related to this Story

Thankfully, we can cease with all the introspection, all those sleepless nights of wondering whether our parents were right when they said we should learn a trade and stop all that typing nonsense. A new Canadian study says journalist isn’t the worst job in this country at all. It’s the fourth-worst.

The new study, set for release Wednesday by job-search engine Adzuna.ca, identifies “miner” as the worst job in the country – despite the occupation’s relatively high pay (roughly double, on average, that of the next-four-worst jobs). Courier was ranked second-worst, followed by construction labourer, journalist and sous chef.

The study looked at more than 2,000 job titles, scoring them on 25 criteria including such factors as earning potential, working conditions, competitiveness, unemployment rates and job security.

On the other side of the coin, the study found that the country’s best job was translator, followed by web developer, actuary and accountant.

“These roles boasted the highest levels of job security in the study, some of the highest average salaries … and excellent income growth of up to three times starting salary,” Adzuna said in a news release.

Adzuna also rated web developer as the “most promising” job, a category measuring promotion potential, income growth and job security. It noted that software developers enjoy strong employer demand, a lack of competition, rising environments and “excellent working environments.” The least-promising job was identified as social worker.

Adzuna rated oil riggers as the country’s most stressful job, followed by doctor and pilot. Receptionist was rated as the least-stressful job, followed by librarian and translator.

Here’s a look at the best-and-worst lists:

Best Jobs in Canada

1. Translator

2. Web developer

3. Actuary

4. Accountant

5. Video-game developer

6. Civil engineer

7. Architect

8. Nurse

9. Graphic designer

10. Marketing manager

Worst Jobs in Canada

1. Miner

2. Courier

3. Builders’ labourer

4. Journalist

5. Sous chef

6. Truck driver

7. Electrician

8. Waiter

9. Plumber

10. Hairdresser

Most Promising Jobs

1. Web developer

2. Dentist

3. Doctor

4. Surgeon

5. Mechanical engineer

Least Promising Jobs

1. Social worker

2. Travel agent

3. Waiter

4. Receptionist

5. Courier

Most Stressful Jobs

1. Oil rigger

2. Doctor

3. Pilot

4. Journalist

5. Fireman

Least Stressful Jobs

1. Receptionist

2. Librarian

3. Translator

4. Secretary

5. Charity worker

In the know

Most popular video »

Highlights

More from The Globe and Mail

Most Popular Stories