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Robots weld door components onto the Dodge Caravan and Chrysler Town & Country at the Chrysler assembly plant in Windsor, Ont. (Jerry S. Mendoza/AP)
Robots weld door components onto the Dodge Caravan and Chrysler Town & Country at the Chrysler assembly plant in Windsor, Ont. (Jerry S. Mendoza/AP)

By the numbers: The state of Canadian manufacturing Add to ...

Statistics Canada has updated its annual figures for the Canadian manufacturing sector, and the data paint just the kind of bleak picture you would expect: Despite a post-recession recovery, this is still a much smaller sector than it used to be. And the declines are much more glaring in jobs than in manufacturing revenues – perhaps evidence that post-recession, manufacturers are finding ways to produce more with fewer staff. (A silver lining on the productivity front, perhaps?)

More Related to this Story

The numbers also show the changing geography of Canada’s manufacturing sector: Away from its long-standing central Canadian core. That’s similar to the theme that has emerged in capital investments in the country, as Jack Mintz wrote in Economy Lab earlier today.)

Here is a snapshot of some key numbers in manufacturing:

$606-billion: Total Canadian manufacturing revenues in 2011 (the latest year available)

-6 per cent: Revenue decline since 2006

+7 per cent: Revenue increase in 2011 from 2010

1,510,000: Total number of manufacturing employees in 2011

-314,000 (17 per cent): Decline in manufacturing jobs since 2004

-16 per cent: Decline in Ontario’s manufacturing revenues since 2004

-202,000 (24 per cent): Decline in Ontario’s manufacturing jobs since 2004

-0.6 per cent: Decline in Quebec’s manufacturing revenues since 2004

-86,000 (17 per cent): Decline in Quebec’s manufacturing jobs since 2004

+32 per cent: Increase in Alberta’s manufacturing revenue since 2004

+10,000 (8 per cent): Increase in Alberta’s manufacturing jobs since 2004

+31 per cent: Increase in Atlantic Canada’s manufacturing revenue since 2004

-11,000 (11 per cent): Decline in Atlantic Canada’s manufacturing jobs since 2004

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