Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

Report on Business

Economy Lab

Delving into the forces that shape our living standards
Best Business Blog, EPPY awards, 2011 and 2012

Entry archive:

Economy Lab has moved

Only Globe Unlimited members will now have access to a wide range of insightful commentary
and analysis on the economy and markets previously offered on this page.


Globe Unlimited subscribers will be able to read these columns,
written by some of Canada’s most deeply respected economists,
such as Christopher Ragan, Sheryl King, Andrew Jackson, and Clement Gignac,
as part of our ROB INSIGHT section.


All of our readers will still be able to browse the Economy Lab archives and read our
broader coverage of economic data and news by accessing their 10 free articles a month.


Learn more about Globe Unlimited and how to subscribe.

The OECD says countries spend about 25 per cent more on health care for an obese person than for a person of normal weight. (TIM SLOAN/Tim Sloan/AFP/Getty Images)
The OECD says countries spend about 25 per cent more on health care for an obese person than for a person of normal weight. (TIM SLOAN/Tim Sloan/AFP/Getty Images)

The morning blend Add to ...

Some of the best clicks on the Web



Eating is the new smoking



The OECD has come out with a warning on the growing economic cost of obesity. The think tank says obesity has spread across developing countries 'at an alarming rate' since the 1980s, with 1 in 2 adults currently overweight and 1 in 6 obese. The report says countries spend about 25 per cent more on health care for an obese person than a person of normal weight.



War, what is it good for ...



... Getting a better deal, apparently. Santiago Sanchez-Pages, Senior Lecturer in Economics at the University of Edinburgh, says conflict, from families arguing over vacation plans to interstate wars over resources, is nothing more than a tool for negotiation.



Framing the financial crisis

Yves Smith of naked capitalism gives a mostly thumbs up to the documentary on Wall Street called Inside Job, which opens next month in New York. He calls it a 'very smart, well framed indictment' of a financial services industry that has ' subverted government and the economics discipline.'





G.O.P.'s 'nonsensical' numbers



Paul Krugman of The New York Times on the new math that Republicans are using in the run-up to the November Congressional elections in the United States. He says the G.O.P.'s slogan should be "Deficits are a terrible thing. Let's make them much bigger."







 

In the know

Most popular video »

Highlights

More from The Globe and Mail

Most Popular Stories