Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

Report on Business

Economy Lab

Delving into the forces that shape our living standards
Best Business Blog, EPPY awards, 2011 and 2012

Entry archive:

Economy Lab has moved

Only Globe Unlimited members will now have access to a wide range of insightful commentary
and analysis on the economy and markets previously offered on this page.


Globe Unlimited subscribers will be able to read these columns,
written by some of Canada’s most deeply respected economists,
such as Christopher Ragan, Sheryl King, Andrew Jackson, and Clement Gignac,
as part of our ROB INSIGHT section.


All of our readers will still be able to browse the Economy Lab archives and read our
broader coverage of economic data and news by accessing their 10 free articles a month.


Learn more about Globe Unlimited and how to subscribe.

As of January, there were 6.5 unemployed Canadians for every job opening in the country, according to Statistics Canada. That’s up from a year earlier, when the ratio was 6.1 jobless people for every vacancy. (These numbers are based on three-month moving averages.). (JASON FRANSON FOR THE GLOBE AND MAIL)
As of January, there were 6.5 unemployed Canadians for every job opening in the country, according to Statistics Canada. That’s up from a year earlier, when the ratio was 6.1 jobless people for every vacancy. (These numbers are based on three-month moving averages.). (JASON FRANSON FOR THE GLOBE AND MAIL)

Is Canada really short on workers? New numbers say otherwise Add to ...

For all the brouhaha over labour shortages, if anything, Canada’s jobs market is showing signs of more slack.

As of January, there were 6.5 unemployed Canadians for every job opening in the country, according to Statistics Canada. That’s up from a year earlier, when the ratio was 6.1 jobless people for every vacancy. (These numbers are based on three-month moving averages.)

More Related to this Story

It’s not the only indicator showing a lull in the labour market. The Bank of Canada’s business outlook survey shows the number of firms reporting labour shortages has fallen for two straight quarters, and is below historic averages, while employers shed 54,500 jobs last month, the most since the recession.

The evidence seem at odds with businesses and some organizations that say they’re grappling with labour shortages. It suggests workers may not be able or willing to move to higher-demand regions, that companies may be having a tough time finding people with the right skills, or that they’re not raising wages enough to entice them.

Follow on Twitter: @taviagrant

In the know

Most popular video »

Highlights

More from The Globe and Mail

Most Popular Stories