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Globe and Mail editors Derek DeCloet, Elena Cherney and Sinclair Stewart (Andrew Norman, Moe Doiron and Kevin Van Paassen/The Globe and Mail)
Globe and Mail editors Derek DeCloet, Elena Cherney and Sinclair Stewart (Andrew Norman, Moe Doiron and Kevin Van Paassen/The Globe and Mail)

The Globe and Mail reshapes newsroom leadership Add to ...

The Globe and Mail has promoted three senior editors in preparation for the roll-out of its premium digital subscription package this fall.

Elena Cherney, editor of the Report on Business, will become the managing editor of The Globe and Mail, leading the paper’s journalism in print and across all digital platforms. A native of Montreal and graduate of Yale University, Ms. Cherney was a reporter at the Wall Street Journal, National Post and Montreal Gazette before joining The Globe. “Elena is a natural leader: an enthusiastic supporter of our journalists with an unbending sense of right and wrong, a believer in people, and an irrepressible champion of Globe journalism,” editor-in-chief John Stackhouse said in a statement to the newsroom.

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Derek DeCloet, an award-winning columnist who has been managing editor of the business section since 2009, becomes editor, Report on Business. In that role, he will oversee all business and investing content in print and online, as well as the Report on Business magazine.

Sinclair Stewart, the paper’s national editor, will assume the title of editor, news and sports. Mr. Stewart will be responsible for The Globe’s news in Canada and abroad. He is a National Newspaper Award-winning reporter and the co-author of a book about Conrad Black that won the 2005 National Business Book Award.

Jill Borra remains executive editor, responsible for leading the digital transformation of The Globe's editorial operations, while Adrian Norris continues as creative director, ensuring The Globe's newsroom and bureaus are the most creative and entrepreneurial in Canadian journalism.

“These changes position our newsroom for the historic opportunity we have this fall to once again change and shape the media landscape in Canada,” Mr. Stackhouse said. “We are putting our great journalism first, in the belief that serious Canadians will want and will pay to know what’s going on in their country and in their world.”

 

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