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Crews work in the area of the derailed tanker cars in Lac-Mégantic, Que., on July 14, 2013. The train derailment and subsequent fires and explosions destroyed much of the downtown area of the picturesque Quebec town. (PETER POWER/THE GLOBE AND MAIL)
Crews work in the area of the derailed tanker cars in Lac-Mégantic, Que., on July 14, 2013. The train derailment and subsequent fires and explosions destroyed much of the downtown area of the picturesque Quebec town. (PETER POWER/THE GLOBE AND MAIL)

Globe wins two Best in Business awards Add to ...

The Globe and Mail has won two Best in Business awards from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers and was a finalist in another two categories.

SABEW honoured 150 works across all platforms from organizations including Bloomberg, the New York Times, the Financial Times and ProPublica.

Grant Robertson and Jacquie McNish were recognized in the daily newspapers ‘investigative’ category for a series of stories on the unknown dangers of shipping volatile Bakken crude oil from North Dakota on North American railways, and the rapid rise in shipping oil by rail. Following the Lac-Mégantic disaster, the reporters spent months uncovering glaring gaps in oversight in the industry. Their work prompted the government to introduce legislative changes, including tougher safety and testing measures for shipping oil by rail.

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"The Globe and Mail wasn’t the only news organization to probe what went wrong last July when a train carrying oil derailed and exploded, killing 47 people in the small Quebec town of Lac-Mégantic," the judges wrote. "But the Globe and Mail dug deeper and found out more, drawing on dozens of interviews as well as company and government documents obtained through access-to-information laws."

Last spring, Nathan VanderKlippe drove thousands of kilometres and spoke with dozens of people – ranchers, pipeline workers, school authorities, even a preacher – to introduce readers to the people of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline proposal. His series, which included stories, an interactive map, photo galleries, a video and an ebook, was recognized in the daily newspapers ‘feature’ category.

"Highly readable and relevant project whose ambitions are as big as the proposed pipeline itself," the judges said. "The reporter consistently delivers on those ambitions with insights gleaned by simply spending time with people living and working along the pipeline’s trail. No one side wins out in this one, no one hero or villain emerges; instead, a complex issue is explained well and brought to life."

Ms. McNish, Sean Silcoff, Steve Ladurantaye, Iain Marlow, Tim Kiladze and Boyd Erman were finalists in two categories (daily newspapers explanatory and technology) for their reporting on the fall of BlackBerry. The main piece, How BlackBerry blew it, “was so rich with detail that the reader didn’t want it to end,” the judges wrote.

The awards will be handed out at SABEW's annual conference in Phoenix at the end of March.

See the full list of winners.

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