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How advertisers can use and misuse Photoshop Add to ...

There are so many examples of fashion and beauty advertising abusing Photoshop that there are blogs devoted to the subject. Here are some examples of its use, and misuse:

Dior

Jennifer Lawrence cemented her Hollywood sweetheart status at Oscar time with an endearing joke about her fall on the way to the stage, a down-to-earth demeanour, and generally for not being Anne Hathaway. But she also took a moment on the red carpet to reflect on digital retouching. When an Access Hollywood host showed her the photos of her new campaign for Dior handbags, she declared, “That doesn’t look like me at all. I love Photoshop more than anything in the world.” When her interviewer tried to disagree, she replied, “Of course it’s Photoshop. People don’t look like that.”

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H&M

Proving that “people don’t look like that,” the Sweden-based retailer courted controversy in 2011 when a Norwegian website revealed that its online store was pasting models’ heads on to a single perfect digitally-generated body. The flawless body was adjusted only to match the model’s skin colour, and appeared over and over in the identical pose with one hand on its hip. A spokesperson for the company said at the time that the “virtual mannequin” pictures would appear alongside photos of real models. “This is not about ideals or to show off a perfect body, we do this to demonstrate an item of clothing. This is done for all clothing, not just for underwear, both male and female clothing,” the spokesperson said.

Ralph Lauren

In 2009, the fashion house threatened legal action against the websites Boing Boing and Photoshop Disasters after they posted an ad for its Blue Label line featuring a model digitally retouched to be completely out of proportion, including an impossibly thin waist. The company later issued a statement about “the poor imaging and retouching” and saying it would “take every precaution to ensure that the caliber of our artwork represents our brand appropriately.” More examples continued to surface, however.

 

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