Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

Columbus Blue Jackets left wing Rick Nash, left, takes a shot on goal from his knees at Chicago Blackhawks goalie Corey Crawford, right, during the first period of their NHL hockey game Saturday, Oct. 23, 2010 in Chicago. (Charles Rex Arbogast)
Columbus Blue Jackets left wing Rick Nash, left, takes a shot on goal from his knees at Chicago Blackhawks goalie Corey Crawford, right, during the first period of their NHL hockey game Saturday, Oct. 23, 2010 in Chicago. (Charles Rex Arbogast)

Sports

NHL taking shot at higher ticket prices Add to ...

National Hockey League teams are taking a shot at raising ticket prices this year, joining other sports leagues that have increased the costs of seeing games as the recession recedes.

The average price of an NHL ticket rose 4.4 per cent to $54.25, a year after the weak economy led the North American sports league to essentially freeze prices, according to an annual survey by a sports marketing firm.

More related to this story

While 11 of the NHL's 30 teams cut or kept their average prices unchanged, the league average included increases of 24.2 per cent by the Washington Capitals and 18.4 per cent by defending Stanley Cup champion Chicago Blackhawks, according to Team Marketing Report, which tracks ticket costs in the major North American sports leagues.

The recession last year forced sports leagues and teams to rethink prices as consumers cut spending on tickets as well as food and souvenirs at the games.

But the NHL's increase echoed upward moves by other leagues as the effects of the recession have eased. Average ticket prices rose 1.5 per cent for Major League Baseball and 4.5 per cent for the National Football League this season, according to Team Marketing Report.

Other NHL teams with double-digit percentage increases in average prices were the New York Islanders, up 19.7 per cent, and the Detroit Red Wings and Florida Panthers, both up 11 per cent, TMR said.

This year, eight teams kept average prices flat, while three cut them, TMR said. Last year, 14 teams had left prices the same, and five cut them.

Prior to last year's slight increase of 0.1 per cent, average NHL ticket prices had risen 5.1 per cent (2008-2009), 7.7 per cent (2007-2008) and 3.7 per cent (2006-2007).

The average premium ticket price is $121.02, TMR said.

PRICE HIKES FOR FAMILY, TOO

Meanwhile, the average Fan Cost Index - the cost for a family of four to attend a game - also rose 4.4 per cent, to $313.68, TMR said.

The FCI includes the cost of four tickets, two small draft beers, four small soft drinks, four hot dogs, parking, two game programs and two caps.

Leading the NHL in average FCI prices were the Blackhawks, up 20.2 per cent to $350.58, and the Capitals, up 15.2 per cent to $327.29, according to TMR. The two other teams with double-digit percentage increases were the Islanders, up 13.3 per cent, and Pittsburgh Penguins, up 11.4 per cent.

The Toronto Maple Leafs remained the team with the highest average ticket price at $115.96, unchanged from last year, TMR said. The Canadian team's FCI was also the highest at $572.32, up 5.8 per cent.

Rounding out the top five teams with the highest average prices were the Montreal Canadiens ($86.44, flat), Calgary Flames ($66.68, up 2.9 per cent), Vancouver Canucks ($65.20, flat) and Edmonton Oilers ($64.87, up 4.2 per cent), TMR said.

Canadian prices are translated into U.S. dollars, and the 2009-2010 prices are retroactively matched to the current exchange rate. The Canadian dollar rallied 15.9 per cent against the U.S. dollar in 2009 and has appreciated a further 2.5 per cent since the start of the year.

The U.S. team with the highest average ticket price was the Minnesota Wild at No. 6 ($62.53, up 2.6 per cent), TMR said.

The Dallas Stars had the lowest average price at $29.68 (off 2.5 per cent), as well as the lowest FCI at $222.68 (off 1.3 per cent), TMR said. The Atlanta Thrashers had the biggest decline in average ticket price, down 10.1 per cent to $43.59.

In the know

Most popular video »

Highlights

More from The Globe and Mail

Most Popular Stories