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The Pratt & Whitney Canada plant is shown Feb. 11, 2009 in Longueuil, Que. The Quebec government is providing financial aid of $19-million to Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. as part of the jet engine maker’s $275-million project to upgrade its Montreal-area facility. (Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press)
The Pratt & Whitney Canada plant is shown Feb. 11, 2009 in Longueuil, Que. The Quebec government is providing financial aid of $19-million to Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. as part of the jet engine maker’s $275-million project to upgrade its Montreal-area facility. (Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press)

Quebec helping finance Pratt & Whitney’s $275-million facility upgrade Add to ...

The Quebec government is providing $19-million in financial aid to Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. as part of the jet engine maker’s $275-million project to upgrade its Montreal-area facility.

The government and the company said the project, to be spread out over five years, will create 90 jobs and help maintain 166 existing positions at the plant in Longueuil, Que., on the south shore of Montreal.

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The upgrade will include an $80-million initiative to create an intelligent-manufacturing centre that is to develop three new production lines using the latest in equipment and technology, the company said at an on-site event Monday.

In attendance were Quebec Premier Pauline Marois and several provincial ministers.

Pratt & Whitney Canada – a unit of U.S. giant United Technologies Corp. – said the production lines will make advanced components for its new-generation family of PurePower engines.

The new geared turbofan engine will power Bombardier Inc.’s C Series aircraft and other planes by different aerospace manufacturers.

P&W Canada president John Saabas said the upgrade “will propel P&WC into the future.

“P&WC is a global company whose roots have been firmly planted in Canada for 85 years. These investments once again demonstrate our long-standing approach to innovation and productivity, as well as our ongoing efforts to improve our technologies and modernize our infrastructure.”

The new production lines will use advanced materials in the making of the new engine parts and be equipped with automation, closed-loop process control and high-precision machining technologies, P&W Canada vice-president of operations Benoit Beaudoin said.

Installing the new production lines will require a major upgrading of the Longueuil plant. The start of operations is expected in 2015.

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