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Eggs packed in cartons are pictured at a chicken farm in the western town of Schleiden January 6, 2011. (INA FASSBENDER/INA FASSBENDER/REUTERS)
Eggs packed in cartons are pictured at a chicken farm in the western town of Schleiden January 6, 2011. (INA FASSBENDER/INA FASSBENDER/REUTERS)

Report on Small Business

Ten best small business stories of the week Add to ...

Check out the best stories of the week of May 21 from Report on Small Business, the Globe's home for entrepreneurs. Read our columnists, view archives of discussions, and connect through social media on the Report on Small Business homepage.

Canadian inventor cracks the case of the broken egg. The Innovators: With his invention, Canadian newspaper man Joseph Coyle solved a problem for local farmers whose eggs kept breaking on the way to the markets.

Small business welcomes new EI changes. CFIB hopes changes will open up new vein of talent.

Is it time to hire a publicist? The Challenge: Publicity will be increasingly important to founder of LoveSewing and the Sewing Studio as she launches her latest initiative, but her own time limitations are weighed against the cost.



Canadian innovations get to market faster. Life sciences continue to be a challenge, but entrepreneurs are increasingly moving out of research and into development. Also, prosthetic foot takes seven years to get to market.

As your business grows, don't hesitate to hire a CFO. They can act as a catalyst and help the company grow faster, says owner of Ontario engineering firm. Plus, telltale signs that you need a chief financial officer.

Ten steps to manage personal devices brought to work. The “ bring your own devices” to work – or BYOD – movement is a sea change, and it’s up to businesses to make the best of it. Here’s how.

Big, beautiful shrine to great music defies the odds. In the era of low-budget home recording, Revolution Recording’s multimillion-dollar studio, located in the heart of Toronto, was a gamble that paid off.



Starting up? Avoid these three common mistakes. For those toying with the idea of becoming an entrepreneur, here are three common mistakes to avoid.

Know your 'cash runway.' Entrepreneurs must understand their personal cash runways, as well as those of their employees and the company as a whole

The right vision can inspire innovation, passion and pride. Your vision should be more than a bottom line– it should be a tangible big-picture goal that galvanizes your people and exemplifies the values of your organization.

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