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Endangered African penguins gather near the water at the Vancouver Aquarium. The exhibit opened May 18. (Rafal Gerszak For The Globe and Mail)
Endangered African penguins gather near the water at the Vancouver Aquarium. The exhibit opened May 18. (Rafal Gerszak For The Globe and Mail)

Ten best small business stories of the week Add to ...

Check out the best stories of the week of July 2 from Report on Small Business, the Globe’s home for entrepreneurs. Read our columnists, view archives of discussions, and connect through social media on the Report on Small Business homepage.

Professionals Week: Learn to delegate or risk diluting skills. Administrative details can become major distractions from the work business owners really want to do, Also, how to balance professsion with business.

Every day a surprise at this exotic animal clinic. Video: Karen Regan discusses the challenges, myths and rewards of being a veterinarian at the Animal Hospital of High Park.

What is your practice worth? For professional services firms, a partnership structure means valuation is crucial, especially when partners join or leave.

Lawyers dip their toes into cloud services: When confidentiality and reliability are an obligation, online storage introduces a whole new set of variables. Also, questions to ask cloud service providers.

How to keep star staff from jumping to bigger ships. The Challenge: Small ad agency Elemental wants to put a stop to talent it’s trained leaving for larger employers.

Artificial rock ‘artists’ create home for endangered penguins. The goal for creators of aquarium exhibit is for their creations not to be noticed. Also see the photo gallery: Building rock habitats for penguins and other customers.

Spammers turn their gaze to social media.E-mail spam dropped 13 per cent last year as malware authors switched focus to other platforms.

Hiring unqualified family members can poison the well. Small businesses need clear rules that help them avoid even the appearance of bias.

How to cut through the complexities of selling to larger companies. Case study: The developers of FatStax had to find a way to make it easier for decision-makers in big companies to see the benefit of their product.

Victorial paddleboard-maker stands and delivers. Jason Heinz has been shaping surfboards since he was 15. In March, 2011, he opened his own shop, Epic Surf Co., in his native Victoria.

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