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We held our first microbusiness discussion focused on crowdfunding tips and put reader questions to our participants: Karl Pineault and Laurent Champagn of Free Spirit Hostel and Daryl Hatton, founder and CEO of FundRazr, Canada’s largest reward-based crowdfunding portal. (venimo/Getty Images/iStockphoto)
We held our first microbusiness discussion focused on crowdfunding tips and put reader questions to our participants: Karl Pineault and Laurent Champagn of Free Spirit Hostel and Daryl Hatton, founder and CEO of FundRazr, Canada’s largest reward-based crowdfunding portal. (venimo/Getty Images/iStockphoto)

Earlier Discussion

Discussion: How to run a dynamite crowdfunding campaign Add to ...

You’ve read about how early stage companies leverage personal assets to fund their businesses. But in the past five years, crowdfunding sites have changed the rules, allowing companies to reach a wider audience of supporters and help validate ideas before they are fully realized.

Not every campaign succeeds, however. In fact, 80 per cent of Indiegogo projects fail to raise more than a quarter of their goal, according to 2013 results from its search engine. So why do some crowdfunding campaigns flourish while others flounder?

On Sept. 19 we held our first microbusiness chat, sponsored by TD Bank. Karl Pineault and Laurent Champagne of Free Spirit Hostel and Daryl Hatton, founder and CEO of FundRazr, Canada’s largest reward-based crowdfunding portal, took your questions on crowdfunding.

If you’d like to view an archive of the conversation, simply click on the ScribbleLive box below. Mobile users may want to click here for an easier-to-read format.

 

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