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SMALL BUSINESS BRIEING

Business owners rank high on well-being score Add to ...

The latest news and information for entrepreneurs from across the web universe, brought to you by the Report on Small Business team. Follow us on Twitter @GlobeSmallBiz .

Only doctors and teachers in better shape: Gallup index

When it comes to overall well-being, only doctors and teachers are in better shape than business owners in the United States, according to the Gallup Wellbeing Index.

Business owners scored 73.4 out of 100 possible points on the index, a measure of 55 items that collectively gauge the physical, emotional and financial well-being of 14 different occupations.

At the top of the list were physicians, with 78, followed by teachers with 73.5; at the bottom were transportation workers, with a score of 63.3. Business owners also ranked higher than other professionals, at 73, and managers and executives, who scored 72.3.

The index is based on more than 170,000 interviews.

As well, 90 per cent of businesses owners said they believed they used their strength to do what they do best at work, ranking fourth of all occupations. Fewer than half –  48.9 per cent –  said their supervisor treated them more like a partner than a boss, the least likely group to view the relationship that way.

Other well-being gauges: More than half – 57.7 per cent – of business owners said they exercised at least half an hour at least three days in the last week, fourth highest of all occupations.

And 62.5 per cent said they’d eaten five or more servings of produce, read veggies, on four or more days in the past week, third on the list, and ahead of physicians. They also tended to be lean: Just 20.5 per cent measured as obese, the second-lowest of all occupations.

Does Lady Luck shine on entrepreneurs?

How much do entrepreneurs count on luck to score in their business? More than a quarter – 27 per cent – say that luck has played a role in their business’s success, according to asurvey from Manta. Another 35 per cent said it’s played “somewhat” of a role, and 38 per cent don’t believe it has factored in at all, according to the poll of 922 small-business owners.

By far, persistence and hard work pays off more, according to 57 per cent of the entrepreneurs asked what has had the biggest impact on their business success. Behind that, business connections and networking were cited by 19 per cent, the economy by 9 per cent, good hiring and strong staff by 7 per cent, timing by 6 per cent, and luck, at the bottom of the list, for 3 per cent.

Similarly, when asked what percentage of success in business is related to luck, 70 per cent said under 25 per cent; while under 2 per cent said it was wholly responsible.

Where they’ve seen their biggest return on luck: for 47 per cent, it’s been in timing (right place, right time); 20 per cent said in making business connections; 19 per cent said in new business or growth opportunities; and 4 per cent said in hiring.

And how do you improve your luck? For nearly a third (31 per cent), it’s about networking and strengthening relationships; 25 per cent say by providing outstanding customer service; 21 per cent see it as driving visibility; 20 per cent say to try new things while leveraging what works; and 3 per cent cite making good hiring decisions.

As for whether they’d rather their luck work out in a lottery win or business success, well, that’s a no-brainer: 73 per cent would rather score in business, versus 27 per cent who want that winning ticket.

Moonlighting entrepreneurs

CNNMoney offers a look at seven entrepreneurs who haven’t quit their day jobs, continuing to clock in at both their professional lives working for someone else and their own entrepreneurial ventures.

KEY EVENTS AND DATES

Third Small Business Challenge contest launches Monday

The Globe and Mail and Telus Corp. are launching their third annual Small Business Challenge contest, beginning on March 18. Recount the biggest challenge your company is facing, and you could win a $100,000 business grant to help overcome it. Keep an eye on our site for further details.

Vision to Reality conference

On April 18, PwC will play host to its Vision to Reality 2013 conference for CEOs of emerging Canadian tech companies. New for this year: Some successful entrepreneurs will lead mentoring workshops for pre-selected applicants (you can apply here). For more on the conference, click here.

East Coast Startup Weekend

Fredericton will be the venue for the first East Coast Startup Week running from March 20 to March 24. The week will include a lineup of speakers, demos, mentoring, competition, and a startup weekend, all aimed at boosting entrepreneurship. For more information and registration, click here .

EDITOR’S PICKS FROM REPORT ON SMALL BUSINESS

Software firm's defence against downturns is in the clouds

Calgary-based time-tracking software provider Replicon needed a different way to deploy its product to companies of all sizes. It found SaaS success, as this week's case study explores.

FROM THE ROSB ARCHIVES

How to keep team dynamic when employees go home to work

Recruiting firm David Aplin Group went in quite an opposite direction from Yahoo in wanting to change its structure so that all of its employees will work part-time in the office and part-time at home. Its concern, as presented in this Challenge last October: how to keep the team-oriented culture going in a telecommuting workforce.

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