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Name-changing entrepreneur Jason Sadler (Laura Evans Photography/COURTESY OF JASON SADLER)
Name-changing entrepreneur Jason Sadler (Laura Evans Photography/COURTESY OF JASON SADLER)

SMALL BUSINESS BRIEFING

Entrepreneur auctions off last name for $45,500 Add to ...

The latest news and information for entrepreneurs from across the web universe, brought to you by the Report on Small Business team. Follow us on Twitter @GlobeSmallBiz.

Just call me Mr. Headsetsdotcom

Some startups turn to family and friends, others to banks, angel investors, even crowdfunding. Florida entrepreneur Jason Sadler has taken a different route to raise money for his startup, IWearYourShirt: He’s auctioned off his last name.

Call him Mr. Headsetsdotcom. That’s the name he’ll be going by all of next year, after the enterprising entrepreneur sold his surname at auction to winning bidder, Headsets.com, a San Francisco-based online headsets retailer, for $45,500, recounts this piece on Huffington Post.

The entrepreneur decided to put his last name up for grabs to raise money for his business, IWearYourShirt, which is in the business of wearing sponsored T-shirts; he auctioned it off to companies online, promising to change his name to the winning bidder for all of 2013. He’ll legally change his name for the year, starting on Jan. 1.

Twenty-five companies put in bids, according to this CNNMoney piece. The final choice came down to a battle between Headsets and PawnUp.com, according to CNNMoney.

“I'm not nervous, because Jason HeadsetsDotCom will be my new name in 2013, but not for the rest of my life,” Mr. Sadler aka Mr. HeadsetsDotCom was quoted in the CNNMoney piece.

Wacky marketing fits right in with Headsets.com’s style, said its chief executive officer Mike Faith in the CNNMoney piece.

For more background, check out this other CNNMoney piece and this UPI story. Here’s more from Mr. Headsetsdotcom himself.

Cuba offers more support to small business

The Cuban government is planning more measures to help increase and foster small businesses, according to this AP report.

What will 2013 look like: Forecasts from top venture capitalists

Where will venture capitalists put their money next year? Inc. asked several; here are the trends they forecast, and where they’ll be interested in investing. Some lessons to prep for 2013 to be had, no doubt.

EVENTS AND KEY DATES

Business planning and financing for young entrepreneurs

Business planning and financing information for young entrepreneurs aged 18 to 39 will be on the agenda of a seminar being held Jan. 9 in Vancouver. It’s a joint effort of Small Business BC, the Canadian Youth Business Foundation and Vancity. For more information, click here.

Franchise show: Montreal

The Franchise Show, a franchise-only exhibition, will be held in Montreal on Jan. 19 and Jan. 20. For more information, click here.

EDITOR’S PICKS FROM REPORT ON SMALL BUSINESS

Canadian road show puts Dubai business on the map

Rider Enterprises was approached by tea company Alokozay to launch its product in Canada in an innovative way. Rider was selected as the top presenter during a media pitch session held at The Globe and Mail’s recent Small Business Summit in Toronto.

FROM THE ROSB ARCHIVES

West Bank draws Canadian entrepreneurs

Starting a business in a conflict zone comes with its own set of hurdles, but some startups see help in strengthening Palestinian private sector, and market opportunity, recounted this piece, published in September, 2011.

Got a tip on news, events or other timely information related to the small-business community? E-mail us at smallbusiness@globeandmail.comJoin The Globe’s Small Business LinkedIn group to network with other entrepreneurs and to discuss topical issues: http://linkd.in/jWWdzTOur free weekly newsletter is now available. Every Friday a team of editors selects the top picks from our blog posts, features, multimedia and columnists, and delivers them to your inbox. If you have registered for The Globe’s website, you can sign up here . Click on the Small Business Briefing checkbox and hit ’save changes.’ If you need to register for the site, click here .

 

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