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This undated photo provided by Starbucks shows a wristband that Starbucks is giving to customers who donate $5 or more to the Opportunity Finance Network, an organization that works with nearly 200 community development financial institutions nationwide that in turn, lend that money to entrepreneurs, small business and community groups that might not otherwise get funding. Starbucks says 100 percent of the donations will go to these loans that will help add jobs or stem job loss. (AP Photo/Starbucks)
This undated photo provided by Starbucks shows a wristband that Starbucks is giving to customers who donate $5 or more to the Opportunity Finance Network, an organization that works with nearly 200 community development financial institutions nationwide that in turn, lend that money to entrepreneurs, small business and community groups that might not otherwise get funding. Starbucks says 100 percent of the donations will go to these loans that will help add jobs or stem job loss. (AP Photo/Starbucks)

Small Business Briefing

Starbucks gives U.S. job market a jolt Add to ...

The latest news and information for entrepreneurs from across the web universe, brought to you by the Report on Small Business team. Follow us on Twitter @GlobeSmallBiz

Starbucks gives U.S. job market a jolt

Starbucks, is kicking off a campaign to stimulate job growth in the United States, in partnership with the Opportunity Finance Network, a group of private financial institutions that provide affordable loans to low-income people and communities.

The global coffee chain's CEO, Howard Shultz, called small business an engine for job growth that has stalled and said entrepreneurs must have access to credit so they can hire again.

The CreateJobsforUSA.org fund will accept donations at the roughly 6,800 company-owned Starbucks cafes in the U.S., and donors who give $5 or more will get a wristband inscribed with the word "Indivisible." Starbucks said they would get the new jobs fund rolling with a $5-million donation from their foundation, despite having to close 600 U.S. cafes just three years ago.

Moody's Analytics Chief Economist Mark Zandi said the fund will be helpful to small businesses having difficulty securing loans in a tough economic climate.

In August, Mr. Shultz, frustrated by political dysfunction in Washington, called on corporate leaders to prioritize job creation to "pick up the slack for community and social investments" that states will no longer be able to fund.

He also urges his peers to "forgo political contributions until the Congress and the President return to Washington and deliver a fiscally disciplined long-term debt and deficit plan," and to focus on the unemployment situation in order to rebuild the confidence of the American people.

eBay Canada’s 2011 Entrepreneur of the Year

Myriam Barreiro of Toronto (eBay ID: mystuff630) has been named eBay Canada’s 2011 Entrepreneur of the Year. With projected revenue of nearly $1-million this year, Ms. Barreiro sells brand name camera and video equipment at discounted prices online. In late 2008, she left her career in banking to focus on her eBay business full-time.

The seventh annual awards program recognizes Canadian entrepreneurs who are running successful online businesses and contributing to the overall growth of e-commerce in Canada. Close to 240 eBay sellers entered the annual competition to receive one of three awards: Entrepreneur of the Year, Service-preneur of the Year, or Newcomer of the Year.

“Entrepreneurs are essential to Canada’s economy and this year’s Entrepreneur of the Year awards recognize some of the most innovative examples of Canadian small- and medium-sized companies doing business online,” said Kevin Wolfley, community relations manager for eBay Canada.

What's the secret to scoring shelf space at Wal-Mart?

How does a relatively unknown company like Orabrush, which specializes in tongue-cleaning products, manage to score a spot on Wal-Mart's shelves?

The answer may rest with YouTube, according to this article for the Wall Street Journal.

In 2008, 76-year-old Bob Wagstaff paid $40,000 to advertise his products on infomercials. Unfortunately this pricey strategy didn't quite play off.

To figure out why this promotion failed, he enlisted the help of a marketing professor, who solicited suggestions from students on how to get the word out. One student suggested a YouTube video, and volunteered to produce it. For $500, Mr. Wagstaff bought himself a funny two-minute video that quickly went viral.

Orabrush's YouTube channel, Cure Bad Breath, has more than 39 million views and 160,000 subscribers. It's the third most popular channel behind OldSpice (No. 1) and Apple (No. 2)

While Wal-Mart claims it didn't reach out to Orabrush because of its YouTube popularity, the videos did raise its profile among consumers, says the company spokesperson.

The work-life balance myth

There's no way to truly achieve a work-life balance, but there is a way to bridge a bit more of the gap between the two, says the author of The Toilet Paper Entrepreneur and writer of this blog from AMEX's Open Forum.

By defining the balance, finding your individual balance and discovering the work-life integration, you can find a system that works for you that still lets you do what you love and spend time with the people you love.

EVENTS AND KEY DATES

CanadaOne's inaugural 'Small Business Series' kicks off on October 06 at the North York Central Library from 6:30 - 8:00pm. Find out how two 2 MBA graduate students turned an idea pitched in an entrepreneur class into a successful web video business called WeblishPal. The website connects Chinese learners with native English speakers from around the world for real-time video chats.

Network with other business professionals and check out the exciting exhibitor hall at the Small Business Expo in New York City.

EDITOR'S PICKS FROM REPORT ON SMALL BUSINESS

Video: CanvasPop gives office a Meatpacking District makeover

In this edition of the Amazing Space, large format printer CanvasPop.com shows off its splashy warehouse in Ottawa, complete with DJ turntable station.

FROM THE ROSB ARCHIVES

Squeezing the toxin from your workplace

Toxic employees often fly beneath the radar. Here’s how to find them.

Got a tip on news, events or other timely information related to the small-business community? E-mail us at yourbusiness@globeandmail.com

Join The Globe’s Small Business LinkedIn group to network with other entrepreneurs and to discuss topical issues: http://linkd.in/jWWdzT

 

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