Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

Report on Business

Streetwise

News and analysis on Bay Street and the world of finance
available exclusively to subscribers of Globe Unlimited

Entry archive:

Paul Tucker, the deputy governor of the Bank of England is seen in a June 2011 photograph provided by the Bank of England. (Bank of England)
Paul Tucker, the deputy governor of the Bank of England is seen in a June 2011 photograph provided by the Bank of England. (Bank of England)

Lunch meeting: Libor e-mails reveal Tucker’s Barclays concerns Add to ...

The Bank of England makes public Paul Tucker’s correspondence with Bob Diamond ahead of Libor-fixing scandal hearing.

Could Barclays really consider dividing itself in two?
Directors are rumoured to be thinking of listing the investment bank in New York, and leaving the rest listed in London. Some say this report is inaccurate.

More Related to this Story

Fewer sales made by private equity companies
Between tough debt markets and an unstable euro zone there are fewer companies being sold.

Two luxe brands to be bought up
The Valentino fashion label is reported to have been sold for roughly $722-million, while Remy Cointreau may buy Scottish whisky maker Bruichladdich Distillery to tap the Asian whisky market.

Bolthouse Farms acquisition is mm, mm, good
Campbell Soup buys the beverage maker from private equity firm for a whopping $1.55-billion U.S.

American whistleblowers get their rewards
SEC about to pay out $452-million U.S. for tips that led to a recovery by the U.S. government.

Italian PM blames "northern" EU states for steep rise in borrowing rates in Italy and Spain
Mario Monti also points the finger at Finland and the Netherlands for hurting the euro zone’s “credibility.”

Where should we have put our money?
This chart looks at how have various fixed income asset classes have performed so far this year.

Greece dumps jets
As state-owned airline gets privatized, the embattled government hopes planes will raise $40-million to put towards public debt.

Apartment vacancy rates hit bottom, landlords push rents up
With more people keeping their cash out of the housing market, landlords are charging top dollar for living space.

Follow on Twitter: @j2nelson

In the know

Most popular video »

Highlights

More from The Globe and Mail

Most Popular Stories