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In this Thursday, Nov. 17, 2016, file photo, McDonald's CEO Steve Easterbrook demonstrates an order kiosk, with cashier Esmirna DeLeon, during a presentation at a McDonald's restaurant in New York's Tribeca neighborhood. Jobs in the accommodation and food-services industry are most vulnerable to automation, according to a new study released this week, as fast-food chains across the country embrace self-ordering technology. (Richard Drew/AP)
In this Thursday, Nov. 17, 2016, file photo, McDonald's CEO Steve Easterbrook demonstrates an order kiosk, with cashier Esmirna DeLeon, during a presentation at a McDonald's restaurant in New York's Tribeca neighborhood. Jobs in the accommodation and food-services industry are most vulnerable to automation, according to a new study released this week, as fast-food chains across the country embrace self-ordering technology. (Richard Drew/AP)

Study says food-service, hospitality jobs susceptible to automation Add to ...

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Jobs in the accommodation and food-services industry are most vulnerable to automation, according to a new study released this week, as fast-food chains across the country embrace self-ordering technology.

Although the C.D. Howe Institute study found that Canada’s labour market is concentrated in industries that have a low probability of being taken over by robots, the report said that 72 per cent of employment in the accommodation and food-services industry was “highly susceptible” to automation.

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