Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

Dancers perform at the Crazy Horse cabaret in Paris Feb. 29, 2012 (JACKY NAEGELEN)
Dancers perform at the Crazy Horse cabaret in Paris Feb. 29, 2012 (JACKY NAEGELEN)

7 Things

Exotic dancers win pay hike Add to ...

Some things-with-a-twist we noticed this week. Get the top business stories on weekdays on BlackBerry or iPhone by bookmarking our mobile-friendly webpage.

Follow Michael Babad and Globe top business news on Twitter

Something to bargain with Industrial and government workers may be held back at the bargaining table, but the 18 topless dancers at the famed Crazy Horse night club in Paris won a 15-per-cent pay hike after a short-lived strike.

More related to this story

Well, that didn't take long Pivotal Research Group analyst Brian Wieser slapped a "sell" rating on Facebook shares Friday, in what Reuters reported may have been the first such recommendation on stock of the social network. He has a $30 (U.S.) target.

Tweets of the week From @BorowitzReport: If you have a mortgage with JP Morgan Chase, tell them you lost all your money at the racetrack. They'll understand.

From @ObsoleteDogma: BREAKING: Greece changing its name to "Facebook".

From @edrabbit: Why is Facebook going public? They couldn't figure out the privacy settings either.

From @pourmecoffee before Facebook shares traded Friday: Hug a Winklevoss twin today.

Taxing work "They call us loan sharks, bloodsuckers; my colleagues have to deal with anxiety and stomach aches every day and they are scared," Roman tax collector Daniela Ballico told Bloomberg News, referring to the reaction to the government's attempt to clamp down on evasion.

Dog bites man Dog bites in the United States cost insurers almost $479-million (U.S.) last year, according to the Insurance Information Institute, accounting for more than one-third of all claims. The average cost of a claim for a dog bite rose 12.3 per cent to $29,396.

Quote of the week "We came in peace, and I'm delighted to say that we're at peace once again." So said Bill Ackman of Pershing Square Capital Management after forcing the chief executive and several board members at Canadian Pacific Railway Ltd. to leave in advance of a shareholder vote Mr. Ackman was set to win after a decidedly un-peaceful battle.

What's in a name? Cameco Corp. has agreed to acquire a European company named ... Nukem.

 
Live Discussion of false on StockTwits
More Discussion on false

Topics:

In the know

Most popular video »

Highlights

More from The Globe and Mail

Most Popular Stories