Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

Entry archive:

Sidney Crosby of the Pittsburgh Penguins falls to ice against the Washington Capitals during the 2011 NHL Bridgestone Winter Classic at Heinz Field on January 1, 2011 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. (Brian Babineau/Brian Babineau/NHLI via Getty Images)
Sidney Crosby of the Pittsburgh Penguins falls to ice against the Washington Capitals during the 2011 NHL Bridgestone Winter Classic at Heinz Field on January 1, 2011 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. (Brian Babineau/Brian Babineau/NHLI via Getty Images)

Seven in the morning

A Pack dynasty; Crosby a baby (or not) a soccer mutiny and more Add to ...

He doesn't.

4. Sid the Kid -- idealized Canadian male or Mario's pool boy? Discuss:

A sociologist at Trent University (is there any other kind?) started flipping through the coverage of Sidney Crosby over the years and found a bit of a dichotomy which she turned into an academic study. I'm in no position to raise an eyebrow about how people make a living, but you go right ahead. The question is simply, is Crosby a humble Canadian superstar who carries his team on his back through big games and isn't afraid to get his hands dirty in the corners, or prima donna who lived in Mario Lemieux's house just a little too long and whines to the refs about a paper cut? Pundits and fans have branded the Pittsburgh Penguins captain with both reputations over his six seasons in the National Hockey League, and a new study examines those different versions of Sid the Kid and how Canadians see their national identity reflected in him - and those Tim Hortons commercials."He is celebrated as the saviour of hockey. There's a lot invested in him as the replacement to Wayne Gretzky and in terms of national identity. It's been a long time since we've had a true Canadian superstar hockey player that we can rest a lot of national hopes on," says Kristi Allain, a sociologist at Trent University in Peterborough, Ont. "The way he's presented in the media, in some ways, tells a story about what we think it means to be Canadian: hardworking, honest, soft-spoken, polite, tough when we need to be, fair."

5. Canadian women's soccer mutiny:

The Canadian women's soccer team has a chance to be the feel-good story of the summer as they head into the World Cup in Germany as the No.9 ranked team in the world and fully capable of winning a medal at the global event. But before that happens they have some major issues that need to be worked out with the Canadian Soccer Association; things are going so well they've announced they're going on strike to protest how their coach - who just told the CSA she'll be quitting after the World Cup -- is being treated and how they're getting paid. Otherwise, everything is fine: They plan to board a plane Friday for a training camp in Rome with Morace but say they will refuse to play in the Cyprus Cup tournament, which starts Feb. 28, until the coaching issue is resolved."Ideally we go to Rome and then we go to Cyprus and we play the games," said Sinclair. "But we can't let this go on any longer and we feel like it's our time to make a stand." A CSA spokesman said the association had reached out to Morace in the hope of speaking to her. The impasse comes at the worst possible time. The CSA is in the midst of bidding to host the 2015 Women's World Cup. Under Morace, Canada has risen to ninth in the world. Morace's coaching record with the national team is 19-8-5, which included a record 11-game unbeaten streak. "This was not a decision taken lightly, knowing that this is probably our best chance at a World Cup medal," Sinclair said of the potential boycott. "And knowing that we are potentially giving up camps and games. But there's a bigger picture here. "I've been playing on the national team for 10 years and nothing's changed. In fact things have probably gone backwards in terms of the CSA's dealing with the women's team. And I feel I'm in a position in my career and a position on the national team where you're fighting for the bigger picture, you're fighting for future national team players, the young ones on the team, the young kids that are playing soccer now throughout Canada.

"This is something that needs to be fixed and we're in a position to do that."

6. Antonio Cromartie -- not the greatest spouse:

Single page
 

In the know

Most popular video »

Highlights

More from The Globe and Mail

Most Popular Stories