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Baltimore Orioles manager Buck Showalter (L) argues a call with home plate umpire Angel Hernandez during a break in play against the Toronto Blue Jays during the second inning of their American League baseball game in Toronto June 21, 2013. (MARK BLINCH/REUTERS)
Baltimore Orioles manager Buck Showalter (L) argues a call with home plate umpire Angel Hernandez during a break in play against the Toronto Blue Jays during the second inning of their American League baseball game in Toronto June 21, 2013. (MARK BLINCH/REUTERS)

MLB borrows NHL model for expanded replay review Add to ...

“I would be for it as long as it was something that a coach can’t put up his hand every 30 seconds,” Boudreau said. “I don’t know how they’d do it, but there are times when goals are disallowed or allowed mainly with people knocking the goalie or something to do with that could be challenged.”

Boudreau recalled incidents from the 2008 and 2010 playoffs when his Washington Capitals were on the wrong end of potential goaltender interference calls.

“If we had (challenges) in those situations, things might’ve been a little bit different. It might’ve been different for my life, too,” said Boudreau, who was fired as Capitals coach in 2011 and hired in Anaheim days later.

The NHL has considered that possibility, though Murphy singled out goalie interference as a play that is difficult to review because a “solid criteria” hasn’t been figured out yet on how to rule on it.

“A lot of discussion has taken place with our managers about coach’s challenges, and we’ve beaten it up pretty good,” Murphy said. “You get into reviews on goalie interference, that’s a very subjective area, so we’ve got to have very defined parameters as to what is goalie interference. ... There’s a lot going on there that has to be detailed if you’re going to do it this accurately and do it correctly.”

MLB tested out instant replay during the Arizona Fall League, and several areas had to be clarified before players and umpires consented to the expansion and all 30 teams unanimously voted to approve it. Ultimately, it came after too many incorrect calls over a number of years.

“(Executive VP of baseball operations Joe Torre) explained it in a beautiful way,” La Russa recalled. “When the game is over and there’s been a big miss and the wrong team caught a break that probably directed impacted it, there’s so much conversation about the miss that you forget about the competition that went on that got to that point.”

A similar instance occurred in the NHL on Saturday night when the Detroit Red Wings scored the tying goal against the Los Angeles Kings after the puck went off the protective netting, which is supposed to be out of play. That play is not reviewable as replay is limited to just goals — whether the puck went over the line, was kicked in or directed in with a high stick.

The NHL planned to have video review for all double-minor high-sticking penalties this season, but too many questions about various scenarios put that on hold. Director of hockey operations Colin Campbell, who Murphy credited with coming up with the situation room approach to streamline the process, said in September he’d like to see offside plays reviewed in the event they lead to goals that shouldn’t have counted.

A player sending the puck over the glass from the defensive zone leading to a penalty is another controversial call that could at some point become subject to video review.

All that could come via coach’s challenges, but Murphy said it wouldn’t change much of how the situation room operates.

“It would just expand the criteria that we can review, whether it’s a puck over the (glass), whether it’s a goalie interference, whether it be offside,” Murphy said. “It would have to be a non-judgment play.

“It would be a play where we have to have complete and accurate video review in order to make it.”

The future of replay review in the NHL could include high-speed cameras put in goal-posts and crossbars, according to Murphy, who said attempts to put a microchip in the puck to prove the certainty of goals have proven unsuccessful. Below-freezing temperatures aren’t ideal for that.

“Anything we’ve ever tested, that hasn’t worked,” Murphy said. “For whatever reason the dynamics of the puck, altering the state of the puck has been a problem. The players haven’t liked the way it’s performed.”

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