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This Jan. 24, 2010, file photo shows Minnesota Vikings quarterback Brett Favre being helped off the field after being hit during the third quarter of the NFC Championship NFL football game against the New Orleans Saints, in New Orleans. The NFL says that New Orleans Saints players maintained a bounty program over the last three seasons that targeted opponents with the intent to injure them. The league disclosed the findings of an investigation Friday, saying between 22 and 27 defensive players and at least one assistant coach were involved. The NFL began its investigation in early 2010 after receiving allegations that quarterbacks Kurt Warner of Arizona and Brett Favre of Minnesota had been targeted. (AP Photo/Morry Gash, File) (Morry Gash/AP)
This Jan. 24, 2010, file photo shows Minnesota Vikings quarterback Brett Favre being helped off the field after being hit during the third quarter of the NFC Championship NFL football game against the New Orleans Saints, in New Orleans. The NFL says that New Orleans Saints players maintained a bounty program over the last three seasons that targeted opponents with the intent to injure them. The league disclosed the findings of an investigation Friday, saying between 22 and 27 defensive players and at least one assistant coach were involved. The NFL began its investigation in early 2010 after receiving allegations that quarterbacks Kurt Warner of Arizona and Brett Favre of Minnesota had been targeted. (AP Photo/Morry Gash, File) (Morry Gash/AP)

Pay for Pain

Reaction to 'bounty' report Add to ...

Selected reactions to the NFL’s report into ‘bounties’ handed out by New Orleans Saints players for injuring or ‘taking out’ opposition players.

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Brett Favre, who as Minnesota Vikings quarterback, received some particularly hard hits from the Saints in the NFC Championship game in the 2009 season, told Sports Illustrated: “It’s football. I don’t think anything less of those guys. Said or unsaid, guys do it anyway If they can drill you and get you out [of the game] they will.”

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Jay Feely, placekicker, Arizona Cardinals, “No place in NFL for bounties. Physical play is an attribute but malicious intent should be removed”.

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Detroit Lions safety Chris Harris: “Football is a violent game n just because someone is hit very hard doesn’t mean it’s malicious.”

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Kurt Warner, retired NFL quarterback, who was also on the receiving end from the Saints in his final game in the league, told KTAR radio in Phoenix: “I’m not going to tell you that I haven’t believed that there was probably defensive players that got together and said, ‘Hey, you know, a thousand bucks for the first guy to knock Kurt out of a football game.’ I’m sure that’s been a part of our league for a long time.”

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Chris Kluwe, Minnesota Vikings punter: “I mean seriously, think about it. You’re talking about paying someone to INTENTIONALLY injure someone else. They put people in JAIL for that.”

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Buffalo Bills linebacker Shawn Merriman: “Why is this a big deal now? Bounties been going on forever. A “Bounty” left me with a torn PCL and LCL in my knee.”

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Former Saints safety Darren Sharper said the payments related purely to making ‘big plays’ and not hurting opponents:

“I think this is something that, from when I got in the league in 1997, has happened thousands and thousands of times over,” Sharper said.

“It’s ridiculous that someone is trying to say that we made bounties on knocking guys out, when basically all it was is that when a guy gets an interception, then he might get paid. That’s something that guys do amongst themselves.”

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Damien Woody, former offensive lineman with the New York Jets and New England Patriots; “This ‘bounty’ program happens all around the league...not surprising.”

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San Diego Chargers linebacker Shaun Phillips: “I think people forget that football is a contact sport. If you don’t wanna get hurt don’t play. I was always told keep your head on a swivel.”

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