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Bradley Wiggins (BOGDAN CRISTEL/REUTERS)
Bradley Wiggins (BOGDAN CRISTEL/REUTERS)

Paul Attfield

Good week; bad week Add to ...

GOOD

Bradley Wiggins

Despite his three Olympic gold medals, Tour de France contender Vincenzo Nibali was quick to dismiss the Brit’s challenge for this year’s crown, and his quote, “Wiggins doesn’t impress me,” was splashed all over the French tabloids Saturday morning. Must have struck a nerve. Wiggins not only claimed the yellow jersey later that day, but then destroyed the entire field in Monday’s time trial to open a whopping lead of 1 minute 53 seconds.

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BAD

Robinson Cano

For once the Butler never had the chance to do it, instead leaving the Yankees second baseman fingered as the culprit. Despite saying he would pick him, Royals designated hitter Billy Butler was rooted to the bench when Cano led his four-man American League team into the home run derby Monday, leaving the hometown Kansas City crowd to boo everything he did – which wasn’t much. The defending champion couldn’t even hit one measly ball over the fences of Kauffman Stadium.

Kobe Bryant

Far be it from us to criticize the Lakers star’s sense of confidence – five NBA rings speak volumes for his basketball acumen – but he opened himself up to derision this week by stating that the current crop of U.S. Olympians could best the 1992 Dream Team. Predictably that drew a slew of comments from the veterans of that squad, but perhaps none were more poignant than those uttered by Kobe’s long-time idol, Michael Jordan, who tried unsuccessfully to contain the laughter before uttering: “For him to compare those two teams is not one of the smarter things he ever could have done.”

Andy Murray

In true British fashion, there were no cheers, only tears in the aftermath of a major sporting event. Like Paul Gascoigne and David Beckham before him, Murray turned on the waterworks after relinquishing the Wimbledon title in four sets to Roger Federer last Sunday, but then there’s hardly any shame in losing to the best tennis player in history. Still, he can take heart after joining his coach Ivan Lendl as the only men to lose their first four Grand Slam finals – the fifth time proved a charm for the eight-time Grand Slam winner.

Ronaldinho

“Pepsi-Cola hits the spot – 12 full ounces, that’s a lot. Twice as much for a nickel, too – Pepsi-Cola is the drink for you.” The soft drink’s original jingle rang true this week when the Brazilian forward decided that Pepsi was the drink for him at a news conference. Unfortunately, Coca-Cola disagreed, ending its endorsement deal with the former Barcelona star and cancelling his $750,000 contract, which makes it one expensive drink, even for a professional athlete.

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