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Former coach and Senior Vice-President of Hockey Operations Mike Murphy, talks with one of the NHL rink officials in the National Hockey League video room, where he and other staff review goals, hits, penalties and other aspects of all the NHL games being played on March 15,2012 in Toronto. (Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail) (Deborah Baic/Deborah Baic /The Globe and Mail)
Former coach and Senior Vice-President of Hockey Operations Mike Murphy, talks with one of the NHL rink officials in the National Hockey League video room, where he and other staff review goals, hits, penalties and other aspects of all the NHL games being played on March 15,2012 in Toronto. (Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail) (Deborah Baic/Deborah Baic /The Globe and Mail)

NHL SATURDAY

A look inside the NHL's video-review headquarters Add to ...

On the video, Joannette can be seen announcing, “After review, it was determined that the puck did not completely cross the line” – followed by a cascade of boos from Pens fans.

“When Bob Errey’s doing the commentating [for the Penguins] anything in the blue is in the net,” Murphy says with a laugh. “But he admitted afterward that the NHL had made a real good call on that one.”

The hardest calls?

“High sticks,” Murphy says. “Because it’s almost impossible judging a three-dimensional play with two dimensions. Trying to find the puck, the stick and the crossbar. You can’t get it exactly where the stick contacts the puck. It’s hard to overrule the referees on those ones.”

How about kicking the puck?

“Kicking, we have more refined,” he says. “Now, it has to be a defined kicking motion. People used to talk about the skate staying on the ice, but you can still kick it in that way. We’ve permitted a lot more pucks off skates. A guy can turn his skate and it’s still good. It’s much more liberal in that way.”

And who gets the tie-breaking vote in case of a disagreement in the NHL war room?

“Whoever’s sitting here is the consensus guy,” Murphy says. “We’ve never had an argument about a play. … Not that we’d ever tell a reporter.”

Around the rinks with Eric Duhatschek

1



Goals for the Los Angeles Kings’ Mike Richards since Christmas, a span of 35 games. Richards received credit for a goal in Tuesday night’s win over the Detroit Red Wings, but replays showed it deflected in off a Detroit player. It was ultimately changed to Drew Doughty. Richards’s only goal in that span came Jan. 14 vs. Calgary. He has 14 goals this season.



30



Consecutive starts for Anaheim Ducks goaltender Jonas Hiller, the longest streak in the league this season. Hiller is being used exclusively because backup Dan Ellis is out recovering from sports-hernia surgery and coach Bruce Boudreau has been reluctant to use backup Jeff Deslauriers.



50



Goals for the Tampa Bay Lightning’s Steven Stamkos, the first player in the NHL to reach that mark this season and only the sixth player in NHL history to score 50 twice before his 23rd birthday. The others: Wayne Gretzky, Mario Lemieux, Mike Bossy, Joe Nieuwendyk and Alex Ovechkin.



“I told Timmy after the first, if he could hold the fort, then I’d keep him in there. But at 5-0, what’s the point? We got Marty back in there for some more work and Timmy got some rest. That became the priority at that point.”



Claude Julien



The Boston Bruins’ coach explains his goaltending shuffle – from Marty Turco to Tim Thomas back to Turco – in a 6-1 loss to the Tampa Bay Lightning. The Stanley Cup defending champion Bruins are reeling with only 12 wins in their previous 29 games dating to late December.



“Why is it that all the GMs get to make all the rule changes and the players get little say?”



@MRichie_10



It doesn’t sound as if Los Angeles Kings centre Mike Richards has heard of the NHL’s competition committee, which vets any rule changes recommended by the GMs and includes five player representatives (Mike Cammalleri, Chris Campoli, David Backes, Ryan Miller and Chris Clark). Maybe he can volunteer the next time the committee has an opening.



How the Avs are succeeding



Funny how trades can work out in strange, unexpected ways. So many people assessing the San Jose Sharks’ moves at the trade deadline thought they’d done a good thing in acquiring a couple of hard-working wingers, Daniel Winnik and T.J. Gagliardi, from the Colorado Avalanche, even if it cost them Jamie McGinn (not to mention prospects Mike Connolly and Michael Sgarbossa). Well, this past week, the surging Coloradans moved past San Jose in the race for a Western Conference playoff spot, in large part because of how well McGinn has fit in with his new team. Playing about three minutes more a night than he did in San Jose, McGinn has scored seven goals in his first eight games in an Avalanche uniform, including the tying goal Wednesday with two seconds on the clock, giving them a shootout win. Colorado is merely 14-4-1 in 19 OT games this season, a big reason it is in the hunt at all. Winnik and Gagliardi, meanwhile, have combined for one assist in their new home. And Dominic Moore, the other deadline addition for the Sharks, has just two points in his first 10 games for San Jose.

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