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Boston Bruins left wing Loui Eriksson (21) celebrates his goal against Montreal Canadiens goalie Carey Price during the third period of Game 5 in the second-round of the Stanley Cup hockey playoff series in Boston, Saturday, May 10, 2014. (AP)
Boston Bruins left wing Loui Eriksson (21) celebrates his goal against Montreal Canadiens goalie Carey Price during the third period of Game 5 in the second-round of the Stanley Cup hockey playoff series in Boston, Saturday, May 10, 2014. (AP)

Bruins take stranglehold on series with Game 5 win over Habs Add to ...

This time, it took just six seconds for the Bruins to find their opening; Chara’s pass to Torey Krug was whipped across the ice for Jarome Iginla to one-time past Price.

The TD Garden was dancing on Bobby Orr Day – May 10th being the anniversary of his legendary flying Stanley Cup-winning goal – and the Bruins were looking every inch the President’s Trophy winners.

In the minutes that followed, a disorganized Montreal squad started to come unglued.

At one point, Subban scuffled with Boston forward Milan Lucic along the boards, later the two exchanged words at the player benches – Lucic flexing his arm while jawing at Subban.

“I think it’s self-explanatory. Just one of those battles within the game,” Lucic said. “Just having a little bit of fun within the game. As series as this game can be, sometimes it has to be fun as well. You know he likes to have fun too. Turn the page and focus on the next game.”

Subban admitted that he was trying to get a rise out of the powerful Bruins’ winger.

"I’m just trying to find anything I can to try and, you know, maybe goad him into taking a penalty or something. He’s a pretty smart player, he’s been around a while so he didn’t really fall into the that,” he said, later adding “I have nothing bad to say about him . . . he was showing me he's strong and I felt it.”

At the 13:01 mark, Marchand got tangled up with Lars Eller at centre-ice, trapping his stick and hand under his arm.

The referee’s arm went up, and Marchand went ballistic, cross-checking the Dane in the shoulder and neck; if he hadn’t gone for the hold, he reasonably could have gone for the stick work, a harsher official might have given him a double-minor.

As it was, the Habs had their fourth powerplay of the game, and after Gallagher was crunched into the boards from behind by Matt Bartkowski (the puck was cycled back to the point), he dusted himself off and worked his way to the net to deflect a Plekanec shot – finally, a positive development for the Czech – past Rask.

With just under six minutes to play in the third, the Bruins added a fourth when Eriksson eluded a sub-par back-check from Brian Gionta to pounce on a poor rebound allowed by Price – a true rarity in these playoffs – and stuff the puck past the sprawled goalie.

It was Soderberg’s third point of the night, he also set up the overtime winner in game four.

In a series where the top two lines have largely canceled each other out, the Bruins’ third-line centre is proving to be a pivotal player.

“I think for him last year, when he came to us maybe a little late, he didn’t get much of a chance to play . . . a couple of things you noticed is that he needed to be in better shape, which he did this year,” Boston coach Claude Julien said. “Eventually he just kind of found his game and he’s fitting in extremely well.”

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