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A young hockey fan waits in the lobby of the building housing the NHLPA offices in Toronto on Wednesday August 15, 2012. (Chris Young/THE CANADIAN PRESS)
A young hockey fan waits in the lobby of the building housing the NHLPA offices in Toronto on Wednesday August 15, 2012. (Chris Young/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

CBA Timeline: Looking back at negotiations between NHL and NHLPA Add to ...

Sept. 12 — The sides exchange proposals with the lockout looming. The NHLPA keeps the first three years of its Aug. 14 offer intact and suggests the final two years be tied to league growth. The NHL counters with a deal that sees the players’ share fall from 49 per cent to 47 per cent, although Bettman calls it “time sensitive” and says it will be taken off the table if not accepted before Sept. 15.

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Sept. 9 — The NHLPA announces plans to challenge the forthcoming lockout with labour boards in Alberta and Quebec in a bid to force owners of the Calgary Flames, Edmonton Oilers and Montreal Canadiens to continue paying players during the work stoppage.

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Aug. 28 — The NHL makes a counter-proposal to the union’s Aug. 13 offer. Using new definitions of hockey-related revenue, it sees the players’ share in revenue fall to 46 per cent over the course of a six-year deal. Bettman hails it as a “meaningful” step in negotiations.

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Aug. 22 — Bettman and Daly hold a secret meeting with Donald and Steve Fehr in Toronto. The group of key negotiators soon becomes known as “The Big Four.”

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Aug. 14 — The NHLPA puts its first offer on the table. The union proposes an economic system delinked from revenues that starts with a salary cap of $69 million in 2012-13. It also asks for more revenue sharing between teams. Sidney Crosby, Alex Ovechkin and Jason Spezza are among the players who travel to Toronto for the meeting.

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July 13 — The NHL makes its first offer to the NHLPA during a meeting in Toronto. The league asks for the players’ share in hockey-related revenue to be reduced from 57 per cent to 43 per cent and suggests numerous changes to rules governing contracts, including a five-year maximum term limit.

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June 29 — The sides meet for the first time in New York.

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