Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

Los Angeles Kings centre Jarret Stoll (28) celebrates Kings defenceman Willie Mitchell's goal past Vancouver Canucks goalie Roberto Luongo (1) during second period NHL Stanley Cup playoff hockey action at Rogers Arena in Vancouver, B.C. Wednesday, April, 11, 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward (Jonathan Hayward/The Canadian Press)
Los Angeles Kings centre Jarret Stoll (28) celebrates Kings defenceman Willie Mitchell's goal past Vancouver Canucks goalie Roberto Luongo (1) during second period NHL Stanley Cup playoff hockey action at Rogers Arena in Vancouver, B.C. Wednesday, April, 11, 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward (Jonathan Hayward/The Canadian Press)

David Ebner

Kings know winning is a must in L.A. Add to ...

In the 18 years since the Los Angeles Kings lost the Stanley Cup to the Montreal Canadiens in 1993, the team has missed the playoffs more than half the time, falling short in 11 seasons.

It’s been so bad that the Kings’ victory over the Vancouver Canucks marks just the second time L.A. has managed to hurdle past the first round of the playoffs since the long-ago Cup run.

More related to this story

Luc Robitaille was on the ice for the Kings in four of the seasons that ended before spring was really in bloom. So, for Robitaille, it was elsewhere in his National Hockey League career that the highest-scoring left winger ever got an inside look at far more successful organizations.

Robitaille, while playing, always had an eye towards business. He took some business courses at Loyola Marymount University during his time as a King, and when he met various corporate executives along the way through his hockey career, he soaked up whatever he could glean. The book What They Don't Teach You at Harvard Business School was a big influence. And playing in places such as Detroit, where he won a Cup with the Red Wings in 2002, Robitaille studied how the organization was built, what made it a winner.

As success finally arrives on the ice in L.A., the business of hockey also flourishes in the city, and Robitaille is a key player, just as he was on left wing in 1993 during the Cup run that fell short. In 2007, a year after he retired, Robitaille became president of business operations for the Kings, joining the start of a major rebuild headed by president and general manager Dean Lombardi.

“I was always a great student of the game,” says Robitaille, referring not to scoring goals but the business of hockey, citing, beyond Detroit, time spent in Pittsburgh and New York in the 1990s when those franchises were strong.

“I saw the culture of those organizations.”

When Robitaille was hired by Kings’ owner Anschutz Entertainment Group, the large sports-music-arenas company, the team on the ice completely crashed, finishing last in the Western Conference. Per-game attendance plummeted by several thousand people and the Kings’ focus was to staunch the bleeding, preaching a plan of major rebuild to their most-devoted fans.

At the same time, the Kings used billboards in a city of multilane freeways to stoke general interest in an urban sprawl of intense competition from other sports teams. The Kings used images of their promising potential stars, the likes of young forward Anze Kopitar and defenceman Drew Doughty, at first putting up only their pictures and the team’s name, but not the players’.

Success on the ice percolated and then took hold, though it has been jagged. Even this year, which was supposed to be a big success for L.A., was a near disaster, including the firing of a coach amid a severe goal scoring drought and a near-emergency blockbuster move for Jeff Carter at the trade deadline. The Kings barely made the playoffs but now the entire season is validated with the win against the Canucks.

“For the next seven to eight years, every year we want to contend,” says Robitaille. “[This season] I don’t think there ever was a panic button, internally, but that being said, we knew we had to win. For us, we’re not about making the playoffs any more. We’re about trying to win the whole thing.”

To be a contender in the second largest city in America, winning is a prerequisite. Of the 13.5-million adults in the Los Angeles area, according to sports consultancy Navigate Research, 1.1-million - 8 per cent - watched or listened to the Kings game in the past year. That is a fraction of the 6-million (44 per cent) that tuned in at least once to the Lakers and is even behind the L.A. Galaxy, the soccer team that caught attention from 1.2-million, or 9 per cent, of Angelenos. The Kings’ popularity ranks only slightly ahead of the Anaheim Ducks.

“You have to win in this town,” says Robitaille. “Because there’s always something to do. You can go see a movie premier, you can go see the Grammy’s, next thing UCLA, or the Dodgers, or the Angels, the Clippers, the Lakers. There’s always something.”

When Lombardi came to the Kings, one of the first signs of rot he saw the weight room at the team’s practice facility, old equipment in a dark room, which he likened to a “prison cafeteria.” When Robitaille came, one idea important idea he had was to reengage the glitz - “our neighbours in Hollywood” he said at the time. Examples of the effort include what’s called the “ice box,” 11 very VIP seats (total price tag: $4,000) used during the season between the two teams’ players benches. The Kings have staff that cater specifically to celebrities, with a Ritz-Carlton inspired “never say no” attitude.

Single page

In the know

Most popular videos »

Highlights

More from The Globe and Mail

Most popular