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Detroit Red Wings' Dan Cleary, left to right, Pittsburgh Penguins' Sidney Crosby, Calgary Flames' Jarome Iginla, Carolina Hurricanes' Eric Staal and Pheonix Coyotes' Shane Doan join other NHL players as they leave a press conference following collective bargaining talks in Toronto on Thursday, October 18, 2012. (Chris Young/THE CANADIAN PRESS)
Detroit Red Wings' Dan Cleary, left to right, Pittsburgh Penguins' Sidney Crosby, Calgary Flames' Jarome Iginla, Carolina Hurricanes' Eric Staal and Pheonix Coyotes' Shane Doan join other NHL players as they leave a press conference following collective bargaining talks in Toronto on Thursday, October 18, 2012. (Chris Young/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

nhl LOCKOUT

The NHLPA’s three counter proposals Add to ...

In response to the NHL owners’ offer of a 50-50 revenue split on Tuesday, the National Hockey League Players’ Association brought three proposals to the table on Thursday in an attempt to bridge the gap.

Here was what the players offered in a trio of five-year plans that were quickly rejected by the league:

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Proposal 1

Players would receive a set revenue figure for a small raise in Years 1, 2 and 3 but would have their salary frozen at the Year 3 number until their share hit 50 per cent. If league revenues increased at 5 per cent a season, the players would receive a share of 55.4 per cent in Year 1 and 50 per cent in Year 5.

Proposal 2

Players would receive just 24.7 per cent of new revenues each season as their share of league revenues shrunk over time to 50 per cent. If league revenues increased at 5 per cent a season, the players would receive 55.5 per cent in Year 1 and 50 per cent in Year 5.

Proposal 3

Players propose here that 13 per cent of revenues would not count toward the players’ share or the salary cap and are instead used to pay existing contracts. The remaining 87 per cent is then distributed among players as part of a 50-50 sharing of that remaining revenue. The NHLPA indicated this option would involve both sides receiving a 50-per-cent share by Year 5 but that was disputed by the league in a press release.

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