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Ottawa Senators' Kyle Turris celebrates his goal against the Boston Bruins with teammates Jakob Silfverberg and Eric Gryba during the first period of their NHL hockey game in Ottawa March 11, 2013. (CHRIS WATTIE/REUTERS)
Ottawa Senators' Kyle Turris celebrates his goal against the Boston Bruins with teammates Jakob Silfverberg and Eric Gryba during the first period of their NHL hockey game in Ottawa March 11, 2013. (CHRIS WATTIE/REUTERS)

Wounded Sens refuse to fade away Add to ...

It's tempting to call these guys the little team that could.

No one could blame the Ottawa Senators for fading from view.

Beset by injuries to their two top forwards, top defenceman and top goalie, the Sens have trouble scoring goals - though they have allowed two or fewer against in five of their last six games, they have only one win to show for it.

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And yet.

They picked up a valuable point against Boston earlier this week in a shootout loss, and remain not only in the thick of the postseason picture, but in the discussion for a home seed.

"You can look at teams that are scoring more goals than us, but they're also letting in a lot more . . . the biggest stat that matters is points, and we've been doing a good job of getting points here and there. At home we've been really good, we'd like to get a little better on the road," said Ottawa captain Daniel Alfredsson.

On Wednesday, the Senators look to avenge a 2-1 loss to the Montreal Canadiens earlier this season in which a tying goal was waved off in controversial circumstances.

Robin Lehner will face the Habs' Carey Price in the goaltending matchup, Montreal will go with the same lineup that won in Florida on Sunday - rookie defenceman Greg Pateryn is again preferred to veteran Tomas Kaberle.

The Habs are also battling the injury bug to good effect - Montreal has won three in a row and is on an 11-1-3 tear since Feb. 12.

The team did, however, confirm some sad tidings on Wednesday.

Winger Blake Geoffrion, the first ever fourth-generation NHLer, has notified the club he is considering retirement at the age of 25.

Though he hasn't yet reached a final decision on his future, according to a statement issued by the Habs, it appears his recovery from a severe head injury isn't progressing the way he had hoped.

Geoffrion suffered a skull fracture and concussion in a freak accident - he was struck in the head by an opponent's skate - at the Bell Centre last November while playing for the Habs' minor-league affiliate Hamilton Bulldogs.

The 2010 Hobey Baker award winner as U.S. college hockey's top player - he grew up in Nashville, Tenn. - is the son of former Hab Danny Geoffrion, the grandson of Habs' legend Bernard "Boom-Boom" Geoffrion and great-grandson of Howie Morenz, another club icon.

Follow on Twitter: @MrSeanGordon

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