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Investigators blame pilot error in Russian jet crash that killed entire ice hockey team Add to ...

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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MOSCOW — A Russian jet crash that killed 44 people, including an entire professional ice hockey team, was caused by pilot error, investigators said Wednesday.

The Interstate Aviation Committee said Wednesday that the Sept. 7 crash of the Yak-42 plane near the city of Yaroslavl in central Russia occurred because one of the pilots accidentally activated the brakes during takeoff and then lifted the jet too sharply.

The plane crashed into the banks of the Volga River, 240 kilometres northeast of Moscow.

It was one of the worst aviation disasters ever in sports as the dead included 36 players — many of them former NHL players — Canadian-born head coach Brad McCrimmon and staff of the Lokomotiv Yaroslavl hockey team.

The only player who survived the crash later died of burns. A flight engineer was the sole survivor.

The team had been heading to Minsk, Belarus, to play its opening game of the Kontinental Hockey League season.

Among the dead were Lokomotiv coach and NHL veteran McCrimmon, assistant coach Alexander Karpovtsev, one of the first Russians to have his name etched on the Stanley Cup as a member of the New York Rangers; and Pavol Demitra, who played for the St. Louis Blues and the Vancouver Canucks and was the Slovakian national team captain.

Other standouts killed were Czech players Josef Vasicek, Karel Rachunek and Jan Marek, Swedish goalie Stefan Liv, Latvian defenceman Karlis Skrastins and defenceman Ruslan Salei of Belarus.

The crash raised new concerns about Russia's aviation safety and prompted the president to suggest replacing all aging Soviet-era aircraft with Western-made planes.

But industry experts say that recent air disasters have been rooted not simply in planes' age, but in a combination of other factors, including insufficient crew training, crumbling airports, lax government control and widespread neglect of safety in the pursuit of profits.

07:14ET 02-11-11

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