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Philadelphia Flyers forward Brayden Schenn celebrates his second goal against the Toronto Maple Leafs with teammate Danny Briere (R) during the first period of their NHL hockey game in Toronto March 29, 2012. REUTERS/Mike Cassese (Mike Cassese/Reuters)
Philadelphia Flyers forward Brayden Schenn celebrates his second goal against the Toronto Maple Leafs with teammate Danny Briere (R) during the first period of their NHL hockey game in Toronto March 29, 2012. REUTERS/Mike Cassese (Mike Cassese/Reuters)

PAUL ATTFIELD

Good week; Bad week Add to ...

GOOD

Frank McCourt

The luckiest man in sports? Try the former Dodgers owner. McCourt bought the baseball club for $430-million (U.S.) in 2004, ran up $579-million in team debt, forked over $131-million in a divorce settlement but still stands to make a pretty penny after selling the franchise for $2.3-billion on Tuesday.

Oscar Taveras

At least Bob Cole actually uses legitimate names. With the Cardinals tied with the Mets last Saturday, 19-year-old Taveras, who was not on St. Louis’s 40-man roster, was inserted into a game as a pinch runner, but could only be identified as “Minor League Guy” by Fox Sports Midwest on-screen. But who can blame them? He’s only the top hitting prospect for the World Series defending champions.

Simon Whitfield

Can you point me in the direction of Simon Whitfield? Sure. You get on at Usain Bolt, go north to Michael Jordan, then south past Nadia Comaneci, Rafa Nadal, Roger Federer and Jackie Joyner-Kersee and Whitfield’s right there. The London Underground is already confusing to foreigners, but anyone going to the British capital for this summer’s Olympics will find it doubly so after the 2000 gold medalist in triathlon joined 360 other Olympic legends in lending their names to stations.

BAD

Luke Schenn

Talk about getting the short end of the genetic stick. The Leafs defenceman could only stand and watch – what’s new? – as younger brother Brayden scored the first two goals of the game in Thursday’s 7-1 waxing by the Philadelphia Flyers. You would have thought he’d have learned something from those backyard games of shinny growing up in Saskatchewan, but then the Buffalo Sabres likely thought the same when they drafted Keith Gretzky.

Chris Singleton

Breadline is not a word often associated with professional athletes, but apparently times are tough in the NBA. So bad in fact that the Wizards forward – who makes an average of $1,588,860 (U.S.) – has been forced to drop $10,000 on lottery tickets in the hope of claiming Friday’s $640-million jackpot. Because life without 50 Lamborghinis just isn’t worth living.

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