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Baltimore Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco has sparked controversy since declaring in a radio broadcast he was the league's top pivot. AP FILE PHOTO/Patrick Semansky (Patrick Semansky/AP)
Baltimore Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco has sparked controversy since declaring in a radio broadcast he was the league's top pivot. AP FILE PHOTO/Patrick Semansky (Patrick Semansky/AP)

PAUL ATTFIELD

Good week; Bad week Add to ...

GOOD

Wayne Simmonds

It wasn’t exactly Leo Messi, but given the way the Flyers winger nodded the puck past Ottawa’s Craig Anderson to open Philadelphia’s account last Saturday, maybe he could have been a soccer player in another life. But then given the fact that this is the same guy who took 25 stitches to his lip before returning to score two goals in a February win over Buffalo, maybe not.

BAD

Joe Flacco

The best? Really? The Ravens quarterback ruffled a few feathers on a Baltimore radio station this week, saying he thought he was the best QB in the NFL. Must be down to all those Super Bowl rings, Pro Bowl appearances and that outstanding 80.9 quarterback rating last season. Either that or he’s really never heard of Tom Brady, Aaron Rodgers or Peyton Manning.

Prince Nawaf bin Faisal

The president of the Saudi Arabia Olympic Committee continued his campaign to be the next chairman of Augusta National on Friday, saying that with regards to the London Olympics, his body was “not endorsing any female participation at the moment.” Someone best remind him to use the rake after he’s done sticking his head in the sand.

Luke Donald

Speaking of the Masters, the bearers of the green jacket almost excluded the world’s No. 1 player after the first round Thursday when an official misread a smudged fax of his scorecard, inputting a 3 instead of the 5 that Donald actually shot on the fifth hole. Strange that in this day and age they’re still relying on faxes instead of e-mailed pdfs. After all, isn’t IBM their chief sponsor. Oh wait …

Gregg Williams

George Halas pioneered the T formation, while Vince Lombardi championed the power sweep. The former Saints defensive co-ordinator – currently serving an indefinite suspension for his role in the bounty scandal – has his own take on physical football, as captured on tape during a playoff game last January: “Kill the head and the body will die.” And people think the NFL is a forward-thinking league.

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