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Aaron Rodgers collected the Galloping Gobbler Award for leading his Green Bay squad to a 27-15 beatdown of the Detroit Lions in the U.S. Thanksgiving matinee game. Andrew Weber-US PRESSWIRE (Andrew Weber/US PRESSWIRE)
Aaron Rodgers collected the Galloping Gobbler Award for leading his Green Bay squad to a 27-15 beatdown of the Detroit Lions in the U.S. Thanksgiving matinee game. Andrew Weber-US PRESSWIRE (Andrew Weber/US PRESSWIRE)

Paul Attfield

Good week; Bad week Add to ...

GOOD

Aaron Rodgers

According to Fox Sports PR folks, the quarterback of the 11-0 Packers picked up “one of the most desired achievements in all of professional sports” Thursday, when Rodgers collected the Galloping Gobbler Award for leading his Green Bay squad to a 27-15 beatdown of the Detroit Lions in the U.S. Thanksgiving matinee game. With the pursuit of perfection going through East Rutherford and the New York Giants next week, it is to be hoped he doesn’t let all that success go to his head.

Mario Lemieux

While the Penguins owner was doubtlessly overjoyed to see his franchise player back with a bang last Monday, scoring four points in a 5-0 whitewash of the hapless New York Islanders – and bettering Lemieux’s own comeback standard of three points 11 years ago – he was likely amused to see that his protégé doesn’t have it all his own way. Sidney Crosby was held without a point two days later, a situation Lemieux didn’t experience until Game 9 of his own return.

Jose Reyes

Not that there aren’t a million reasons why the shortstop might want to move on from the moribund Mets, but comedian Jerry Seinfeld threw a spanner in the works this week. Seinfeld brought his floppy-eared dachshund – appropriately named Jose Reyes – onto national television while filling in for Regis Philbin and made the plea for the real-life Reyes to stay in New York. After all, while it might be easy to disappoint a 300-pound man-child from Queens, how can you say no to man’s best friend?

BAD

Tuala Matthew Vaea

In hindsight, maybe the Queen’s grandson-in-law got off lightly. Mike Tindall was fined £25,000 (about $40,000 Canadian) for his role in drunken cavorting during England’s failed Rugby World Cup campaign. But that was nothing compared to the treatment handed to the Samoa coach, who was ordered to pay a hefty swine fine in the shape of 100 female pigs after disgracing his village and discrediting his chiefly title with his side’s poor display in New Zealand.

LeBron James

While they may not strictly be considered fans, it’s not unreasonable to expect owners to know something about the franchises they invest in. The Heat star did little to impress the fans of Liverpool this week, the club he owns a small stake in, when he raved about its history and the “19 league championships” the team has won, which, while only one off the actual figure, also happens to be the number won by arch-rival Manchester United.

Follow on Twitter: @paulattfield

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