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George St-Pierre holds an ice bag on his head as he fields questions at the post-fight news conference following UFC 154 in Montreal early Sunday, November 18, 2012. (Neil Davidson/THE CANADIAN PRESS)
George St-Pierre holds an ice bag on his head as he fields questions at the post-fight news conference following UFC 154 in Montreal early Sunday, November 18, 2012. (Neil Davidson/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Convincing Comeback

GSP has a chance to settle who is the best UFC fighter debate Add to ...

White is willing to give him the time.

“I’m sure he feels like he got hit by a bus right now. I’m not even going to talk to him about it for a couple of weeks.”

Still he’s confident it will happen.

“I think we can get it done,” he said.

White has targeted May with Toronto’s Rogers Centre, Cowboys Stadium in Dallas or a Brazilian soccer stadium as possible venues.

“Dallas, Texas, probably sounds better for everybody because it’s neutral,” said White, who would be trying to sell 100,000 seats there.

Silva, who was watching cageside, has two fights left on his contract. He wants GSP next and then “maybe” light-heavyweight champion Jon (Bones) Jones.

“It will happen,” White said of Jones. “The fun thing about Anderson Silva being the best fighter in the world is that he falls right in the middle of No. 2 and No. 3 pound-for-pound best fighters in the world. I think we can look forward to some fights.”

White sees Silva fighting GSP, defending his title a few times before fighting, then taking on Jones. But he would not rule out St-Pierre making another title defence before meeting Silva.

Ironing out the details is what he does, White said.

“I want Anderson Silva to love this fight and want this fight. I want Georges to love this fight and want it,” he said.

Both men will make a huge payday, he added. “That’s a no-brainer.”

The St-Pierre camp will have plenty to say on the details. GSP looks small compared to the lanky Condit and the supersized Silva will have a further edge no matter what number he has to make on weigh-in day.

Silva talked of fighting at 177-78 pounds. But St-Pierre said if that was the number, Silva would probably still outweigh him 225-230 to 185 on fight night.

“He’s a big guy, he’s a very big guy,” he said.

White later disputed GSP’s estimate of Silva’s weight.

But St-Pierre clearly believes Silva also appears to have an easier time moving up and down in weight. St-Pierre said his body does not adjust nearly as well.

“At the end of the day if Anderson Silva wants to fight him, let him come to 170 — we never say no,” said Zahabi. “If he wants Georges to come up to 185, then we’ve got to weigh our risks and make the risks worth it. And that’s going to involve negotiations with the UFC and all parties.”

Look for the fight to happen between their weights.

St-Pierre may be the smaller man but he has a huge heart and an ample toolbox.

“I use my body the best I can,” said St-Pierre.“I don’t have the knockout power of a Rampage Jackson. I don’t have maybe the athletic ability of a Jon Jones, I don’t have the accuracy of an Anderson Silva or the wrestling of a Chael Sonnen. But I use my body, with the tools I have, the best as I can and that’s why I win fights.

“It’s not always about the muscle, it’s the mind.”

St-Pierre brought his parents into the Octagon after the fight. “If I’m here tonight, it’s because of them.”

He also gave his championship belt for the second straight fight to Zahabi as thanks.

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