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British Columbia skip Kelly Scott hugs her teammates after they defeated Team Canada (MARK BLINCH/REUTERS)
British Columbia skip Kelly Scott hugs her teammates after they defeated Team Canada (MARK BLINCH/REUTERS)

Curling

Kelly Scott skips B.C. to bronze at Scotties Add to ...

B.C.’s Kelly Scott defeated Team Canada’s Heather Nedohin 10-8 to win the bronze medal at the Scotties Tournament of Hearts on Sunday afternoon at the K-Rock Centre.

Scott picked up a single in the ninth end and stole another point in the 10th for the victory. The result came after a disappointing loss to Nedohin in the 3-4 Page playoff game a day earlier.

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“We brought our hit weights down today and really didn’t change anything other than that and had a great game out there,” Scott said. “So that’s how you want to leave an event like this.”

It was an entertaining third-place game with plenty of rocks in play. Canada hit a double takeout for four points in the third end but B.C. scored three in the fourth to move in front 5-4.

Nedohin added a single in the fifth before Scott added three more in the seventh end. Nedohin replied with three points of her own in the eighth to tie it before Scott went ahead to stay.

The game was a rematch of last year’s final in Red Deer, Alta., where Nedohin beat Scott 7-6 to win the gold.

Earlier Sunday, Nedohin dropped an 8-5 decision to Manitoba’s Jennifer Jones in the semi-final. Later on Sunday, Ontario’s Rachel Homan defeated Jones 9-6 for the gold medal.

Homan beat Jones in the 1-2 Page playoff game on Saturday to lock up a berth in the championship game.

In the semi-final, Nedohin led 4-2 after six ends but Jones pulled even with a pair in the seventh and stole two in the eighth. Nedohin scored one in the ninth to cut the Manitoba lead in half but couldn’t complete the comeback.

Canada had an 89 per cent shooting percentage while Manitoba shot 82 per cent. Nedohin shot 84 per cent to 82 per cent for Jones.

The 38-year-old Jones won a world title in 2008 and is a four-time national champion. Homan, 23, won a Canadian junior title in 2010 and finished fourth in her only previous Scotties appearance in 2011.

Jones was 11-0 over the round robin to become the first skip since British Columbia’s Linda Moore to go undefeated. Moore went 10-0 in 1985 and then won the final in Winnipeg.

Homan’s only loss of the round robin was to Jones.

Homan will represent Canada at next month’s world women’s curling championship in Riga, Latvia.

The Homan and Jones rinks receive $15,500 in prize money for reaching the final. Scott’s team gets $12,000 and Nedohin’s rink receives $7,000.

Teams finishing fifth through 12th receive $3,400 each and all 12 teams receive $4,167 for title sponsor cresting.

The tournament winner also receives $10,000 for wearing cresting at the world championship along with $40,000 from Own The Podium for training and competition expenses. Sport Canada will provide them with $144,000 over a two-year period.

The men’s national championship — the Tim Hortons Brier — is set for March 2-10 in Edmonton. The winner will represent Canada at the March 30-April 7 world men’s curling championship in Victoria.

Notes: Announced attendance for the semi-final game was 3,285. The bronze-medal game drew a crowd of 3,798. Arena capacity is 5,700. ... Manitoba claimed three first-team all-star nods. Jones and teammates Dawn Askin and Kaitlyn Lawes were joined by Ontario’s Alison Kreviazuk. Homan was named to the second team with Canada’s Laine Peters, Manitoba’s Jill Officer and B.C.’s Jeanna Schraeder. The all-star teams were selected solely on players’ statistics during round-robin play. ... B.C.’s Sasha Carter was the winner of the Marj Mitchell Sportsmanship Award and Andrew Klaver was the recipient of the Joan Mead Builder Award. Klaver has been the official tournament photographer for the past 23 years. ... The 2014 Scotties will be held in Montreal.

 

 

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