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Eye-Fi Explore X2
Eye-Fi Explore X2

Cameras

Eye-Fi Explore X2: not your mother's memory card Add to ...

It looks normal enough on the outside, no different than your average memory card. But if there's one thing you should know about the Eye-Fi Explore X2 ($99 at Henrys), it's that looks can be deceiving.

This particular memory card holds 8 GBs worth of photos and videos, but it's not like they'll stay there for long. Wireless connectivity means data can be transferred straight to your computer - cable free - or even uploaded to the internet if you wish. And with GPS geotagging support, you won't just know when those pictures were taken, but where.

Initial configuration involves telling the Eye-Fi which networks to connect, be it your home wireless router, or local café. Each time you're within range with your camera turned on, the device will set to work, all on its own.

If a computer with the Eye-Fi software installed is also on the network, your pictures and images will be sent there for later review. But if you connect to an alternate or unprotected Wifi network, the Eye-Fi can be configured to send those pictures straight to an online service of your choice - be it Facebook, Flickr, YouTube and more.

But what's most impressive about the Eye-Fi card is its speed; photos and video are uploaded within minutes of each capture. The result is surreal, and you'll find friends and family can comment on your uploads in almost real-time. But having such persistent connectivity has other uses.

The card can also be configured to use a local computer's hard drive as source of endless storage. Pictures are still copied as they're shot, but eventually deleted from the card itself to make room for more. It's something that's probably not all that necessary with a card as large as 8GB, but useful if you want to ensure you'll have more room for later.

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