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The 4.3-inch retina display is gorgeous, possibly the best I've seen on any phone. Sony is pushing the Xperia as an HD-playing monster, and with good reason. High-def video runs smoothly on the phone itself, and with an HDMI cable, the Xperia quickly becomes a mobile media mini-hub for your TV. (Handout/Sony)
The 4.3-inch retina display is gorgeous, possibly the best I've seen on any phone. Sony is pushing the Xperia as an HD-playing monster, and with good reason. High-def video runs smoothly on the phone itself, and with an HDMI cable, the Xperia quickly becomes a mobile media mini-hub for your TV. (Handout/Sony)

Sony's Xperia S: Great for video but not a game changer Add to ...

Some of the music player’s features are less useful, but interesting nonetheless. It comes with a virtual equalizer, complete with those pop, rock and other assorted presets that don’t ever seem to have much of an effect. There’s also the option to change the way the music sounds on headphones. I tried this, clicking on the option to make the music sound as though I were hearing it in a “Club.” I’m not entirely sure what kind of clubs Sony’s engineers have been frequenting, but I suspect they’re largely subterranean. Later I switched to “Studio” mode – the difference was like night and night.

As far as looks go, the Xperia is quite pretty, if unadventurous. Ever since Apple launched the iPhone, there’s been a kind of design consolidation in the phone industry. Basically, just about every smartphone-maker in the world today has developed or is developing a single-glass-slab phone. And, to be honest, there really isn’t much you can do to differentiate your single-glass-slab from somebody else’s single-glass-slab.

My favourite aesthetic flourish is the Xperia’s little jade-green Sony-Ericsson logo on the back of the phone, if only because it adds a little bit of colour to an otherwise chromatically impotent device. For some reason, it seems that a whole slew of smartphone-makers are engaged in a Spinal Tap-ish contest to see who can make the blacker phone.

Other than that, Xperia bears a few more minor styling quirks, such as the lightly curved back, or the sliver of transparent plastic at the bottom of the phone, into which are etched the icons for the home, back and settings buttons (one of the annoying things about this plastic bar is that it doesn’t actually contain buttons, just icons. The buttons are above the bar, but you’ll probably find yourself hitting the plastic icons instead).

Under the hood, the Xperia sports a powerful engine. It comes with a 1.5-gigahertz dual-core processor, 32-gigs of flash storage and a 12-megapixel back-facing camera capable of shooting video at 1080p (there’s also a front-facing camera that shoots at 720p). It also supports Near-Field Communications, a wireless technology that is mostly useless right now but could have neat applications in the future, such as enabling phone-based wallets.

The 4.3-inch retina display is gorgeous, possibly the best I’ve seen on any phone. Sony is pushing the Xperia as an HD-playing monster, and with good reason. High-def video runs smoothly on the phone itself, and with an HDMI cable, the Xperia quickly becomes a mobile media mini-hub for your TV. The phone can also show media on TVs and other devices running on the same wireless network.

The phone runs on a now-dated version of Android (Gingerbread), but is upgradeable to 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich). Because of that there’s a lot of this phone that isn’t all that remarkable. The browser, phone call features and general layout are all pretty much what you’d expect from a high-end Android phone (call quality – assuming you still use your phone to make phone calls – is perfectly adequate). Sony does try to make the home screens a little prettier with animated backgrounds, and offers the kind of all-in-one social media feed capabilities that most other manufacturers have started building into their phones. You can share pretty much everything with a couple of taps.

One of the cooler and sillier features of the Xperia is its hyper-fast camera. Even when the phone is locked, you can hold a physical button on the side for less than a second, and the device will come to life, focus on whatever you’re pointing it at, and snap a photo. The results aren’t always great, but I can see how such a feature would be useful, given that a lot of smartphone users end up snapping shots of things that happen without warning all around them. If you’ve ever fallen victim to the pocket dial you can expect your Xperia is going to take some pocket pictures.

Sony’s new Xperia S is one of the better high-end Android phones out there, and probably the best one if you’re primarily buying a phone to watch high-definition movies.

The whole world of Android phones seems to be particularly chaotic right now. Some companies (e.g. Samsung) have managed to make some money off their Android offerings, while others (e.g. HTC) started strong but are now kind of rudderless.

Is the Xperia going to buck that trend and help Sony convince customers to buy the rest of their entertainment hardware and software from the company? Probably not, but it can’t hurt.

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