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A demonstrator shout slogans against FIFA during a protest against the World Cup at a bus station in Brasilia. Brazilians are protesting against the huge amounts of money spent by the government on the upcoming event that starts in June.
A demonstrator shout slogans against FIFA during a protest against the World Cup at a bus station in Brasilia. Brazilians are protesting against the huge amounts of money spent by the government on the upcoming event that starts in June.
(ERALDO PERES/AP)

GLEN HODGSON

The big loser at the World Cup is Brazil’s economic future

Brazil will soon host the world’s two biggest sporting events: the World Cup of soccer starting next week and the summer Olympic Games in 2016. Brazil might feel a moment of joy if the home team emerges triumphant, as often happens at the World Cup. But Brazilians already expect to be net economic losers from the “privilege” of playing global sporting host – not just once, but twice.