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Alberta finance minister Doug Horner floated a new idea for regulatory reform Wednesday, saying new national bodies should be created to handle enforcement and systemic risk, while the provincial securities commissions remain in existence and keep their control of other regulatory issues.
Alberta finance minister Doug Horner floated a new idea for regulatory reform Wednesday, saying new national bodies should be created to handle enforcement and systemic risk, while the provincial securities commissions remain in existence and keep their control of other regulatory issues.
(Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press)

Alberta’s next premier will play regulation hard-ball

Nothing gets the blood pumping in Alberta quite like the long-running scrap with Ottawa over securities regulation.

Well, okay. Several things do. Still, it is a thorny east-west tussle that has simmered for years, even though both governments are now friendly on most issues. Comments by candidates in the race to become leader of the provincial Progressive Conservatives and, by extension, premier, show the federal quest for a national watchdog is going to get no easier regardless who wins.