The Globe and Mail

Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti leaves after a media conference at Chigi Palace in Rome in this December 6, 2012 file photo. Monti announced on December 8, 2012 that he intended to resign once next year's budget is approved in parliament after Silvio Berlusconi's party withdrew its support for his technocrat government this week. Only hours before the announcement, Berlusconi said he would run to become premier for a fifth time on a platform that attacks Monti's stewardship of the economy.
Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti leaves after a media conference at Chigi Palace in Rome in this December 6, 2012 file photo. Monti announced on December 8, 2012 that he intended to resign once next year's budget is approved in parliament after Silvio Berlusconi's party withdrew its support for his technocrat government this week. Only hours before the announcement, Berlusconi said he would run to become premier for a fifth time on a platform that attacks Monti's stewardship of the economy.
(Stefano Rellandini/Reuters)

SUBSCRIBERS ONLY

Italy’s technocrat era is over, but adult supervision still needed

Mario Monti’s resignation puts Italy and its dysfunctional political system back under market watch. But that may not be a bad thing.

The position of the Italian prime minister was looking more fragile by the day. His premature resignation surprises nonetheless. Silvio Berlusconi, whose conservative Popolo della Liberta (PdL) party had supported his successor’s technocratic government since it was formed a year ago, recently began attacking it ahead of next year’s general election. Berlusconi’s announcement that he would run for the prime minister’s job, coupled with comments by his deputy were the final straw. Over the weekend Mr. Monti decided to resign once a budget law is passed.