The Globe and Mail

Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

An examiner demonstrates the process of analyzing a genetically modified wheat sample at the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety in Seoul, May 31, 2013. South Korean millers said on Friday they would suspend imports of U.S. wheat until the results of tests by the Asian nation’s government on whether shipments have been tainted by an unapproved genetically modified strain of the crop. U.S. officials have been racing to quell alarm following news that the strain, developed by biotech giant Monsanto Co., was found in an Oregon field late last month.
An examiner demonstrates the process of analyzing a genetically modified wheat sample at the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety in Seoul, May 31, 2013. South Korean millers said on Friday they would suspend imports of U.S. wheat until the results of tests by the Asian nation’s government on whether shipments have been tainted by an unapproved genetically modified strain of the crop. U.S. officials have been racing to quell alarm following news that the strain, developed by biotech giant Monsanto Co., was found in an Oregon field late last month.
(LEE JAE-WON/REUTERS)

Whipsaw hurts latecomers to rallying sectors

In March, the market trends driving global equities higher not only stalled out, but went south in a hurry. Institutional investors describe what happened last month as a “whipsaw.” Lured to sectors such as biotechnology and social media by seemingly unstoppable positive performance, latecomers were hurt by sudden, bloodcurdling changes in direction.